Episode 313 – Eye of the Storm

Episode 313 Header

You’ll notice as you read this blog that I don’t have a lot to say about what actually happens in the episode. I predicted most of it last week, and while I liked the execution of many of the details, when I compare this week’s episode to last week’s, it just comes up short. Most of what I talk about in this blog are the things I think were missing.

I really, really hope that next season is better balanced in terms of assigning material from the book to each episode. Because I felt like this one was just ticking the boxes that needed to be ticked to finish Voyager and wrap up the season. I didn’t feel engaged by much of the story, even the parts I liked (John and Jamie, Yi Tien Cho and Margaret, some of the interactions between Jamie and Claire).

And, honestly, if I hadn’t already read the books, I wouldn’t feel any particular need to move on to the next season. They’ve wrapped everything up with a nice bow and here we are in the new world. This could easily be a series finale rather than a season finale. But getting back to the episode…

The title card seems to be foreshadowing the storm and Claire being dragged off the ship with a broken leg, but it’s curious to me that they’re showing that. In the talkback at the end of the episode, they said they were trying to set it up the same was as the premiere, but in the premiere, we kept coming back to Jamie on the battlefield, and the rest of the story was told via flashback until things moved forward. This was a time jump—starting at the end and then jumping back in time, to then later catch up to the opening scene. So if they were going for parallel structure, they missed the mark.

I do like the bit with Fergus and Marsali. It’s fantastic that she’s asserting herself in their relationship, and Fergus isn’t beating his chest and telling her no. And he’s no less masculine or manly for allowing his wife to be his equal. It’s really lovely to see.

Damn, I love Lord John. And yeah, things happen pretty much exactly as I said last week. John is never going to let any harm come to Jamie as long as he has the power to stop it. And damn, does he know how to throw his weight around. My heart fluttered as Jamie walked away. David Berry is killing it. All of my other complaints aside, they did a great job of casting this season.

Geillis is super nuts, y’all. And it’s odd to me that Claire used Brianna as proof. Why not just tell Geillis about seeing her at the stones in 1968? Or talk about Greg Edgars? Claire couldn’t have known those things if she wasn’t there, so that should be proof enough that she traveled. I mean, yeah, it’s in the moment and all that, but Geillis is off-her-rocker crazy. Wouldn’t Claire’s instinct be to protect Brianna at all costs? It was her instinct in the book, as I recall—Geillis found the pictures in Jamie’s pocket. “Because it needed to happen for the story/conflict” is not a good reason.

But we’ll just have to go with it. And the rest of the plot pieces come together, as predicted, with Margaret and Yi Tien Cho. I hope they make it to Martinique, and that she’s not too scarred about what happened to her brother, asshole though he was.

UGH to the voice over! It was so intrusive into the scene and threw me right out of the story. It drained every last bit of tension away. We all get it. The pool is the portal. It was clear from the moment they entered. And everything else in the scene made it clear, too. Stating it just made me start thinking and stop feeling—the exact opposite of what you want the audience to do in a moment like this.

And wow, they did not need to keep coming back to the shot of Geillis with her head partially severed from her neck, and the blood spurting. Ugh. Gross.

I did like Claire’s shock, and Jamie pulling her and Young Ian close. That was nice.

But of course, they get back onto a ship. And my first thought is that we just very volubly stated that Jamie could be taken—if he were at sea. (Spoilers: nothing comes of that. Inexplicably.)

I’m very distracted by the soap on Jamie’s face in this love scene. I know, nitpicky details. But soap tastes disgusting, and would be worse in this era—even if it’s expensive soap. There’s no way some of that isn’t going into Claire’s (Caitriona’s) mouth. Ah, finally wiping it off.

As much as I’m all for love scenes with Jamie and Claire—and this one’s dialogue was taken straight from the book—I hate to say it, but this is gratuitous sex. I’ve written a number of blog posts on sex scenes and romance, and the rule about sex is the same as the rule for any scene. If the scene isn’t pushing the plot forward or doing some other story duty (character development, raising stakes, creating conflict, etc.), it should be cut. And that scene should have been cut, because nothing happens except sex.

Or, rather, the scene should have been rewritten so that it acted as a way for Claire and Jamie to reconnect after everything that has just happened. If they’d had Jamie work through Claire’s trauma after killing Geillis, bringing her back with touch and love, this scene could have been amazing. Instead, it feels jarring. Here we are, after everything that has happened, and we’re getting this tongue-in-cheek, teasing, everyone’s happy and hunky-dory love scene. What??

And what about Young Ian? He was raped by Geillis. At least in the book, there was fallout from that act. Gabaldon dealt with it. She didn’t forget about it, or think we’d forget about it. I’m not thrilled with how it all worked out in the book, but she didn’t shy away from it, either. I don’t understand why they didn’t just cut that entirely. They are basically treating it as though it wasn’t a rape at all—which it entirely, 100%, was. And so was what happened to Fergus last season, but they dropped the ball on that one, too. What is up with that?

And then we’re tossed right into a storm. But there’s no sense that any of their actions are driving things forward here. It’s just random.

Why not write it so that they went into the storm because Jamie wasn’t on deck to tell them to avoid it? What if, like in the book, the Porpoise was actually pursuing them and that forced them into the storm? We could have lost the sex scene and done that instead. I still don’t understand why they cut the pursuit from the show. It feels like a mistake, even if I didn’t know how it worked in the book. There was very heavy-handed foreshadowing in the scene with LJG that never went anywhere—Chekhov’s gun that didn’t go off.

Basically, this episode is the culmination of all of their bad choices earlier in the season—and now not having enough time on this end to tell the story we need. They’re having to truncate everything, and the episode ends up just being a string of scenes that don’t feel totally connected.

The literal eye of the storm was a pretty visual, but I’m not getting the metaphor. What is the storm, exactly? Geillis and her prophecies?

Speaking of which, how does she manage to share that news? Did she send letters to like-minded people living in this time, and the word passes down 200 years until Brianna and Roger are living at Lallybroch? Or does someone else make a separate prophecy at some point?

The beach interlude was also baffling. It made more sense in the book to have Claire wake up in the house, and for their hosts to come and talk to them there. And at the end of the scene, the people just stroll away, no questions asked.

There also isn’t the sense of claiming their own identity again that we had in the books, since they’ve been using the name Fraser for most of the season, and certainly since arriving on Jamaica. That was always the big, dramatic bit for me, that pulled me through to the next book. Jamie has had to hide who he is for 20 years, even after Claire returned. But now he is in the New World, with a new start—and that allows him to regain his identity for the first time since Culloden. It’s a huge deal…and we didn’t get that sense at all.

All-in-all, I’m very disappointed with this season. The standout moments are the Jamie portions of the first few episodes, the much more nuanced and careful presentation of Yi Tien Cho, the lovely acting by David Berry, Fergus and Marsali’s relationship, and episode 312. Other than that…wow.

All I can say is that there is no Frank in Drums of Autumn (I don’t even remember any flashbacks, although it has been a while since I read it), and so maybe we will actually get a more balanced season four. One can hope.

Do you agree with my assessment of the season? I know several of you have been liking it, and that’s great! I really want to like it more, I swear. And I’m still hoping for the best as they move forward. There’s the potential for some truly epic stuff in the next book. *fingers crossed*

As usual, I will post a speculation page at some point during the hiatus to consider how to break Drums of Autumn into 13 episodes. But I doubt I’ll get that done until early 2018, as I still have to finish Secret Magic, the fourth book in my Fay of Skye series.

Despite my moaning and grumbling, I really do enjoy watching this show and writing this blog, and I enjoy getting comments from readers. So thanks for chiming in each week, and I can’t wait to see you all again for season four!

Advertisements

Episode 307 – Crème de Menthe

Episode 307 Header

Here we are on the other side of a ridiculous cliffhanger, with the threat of rape still hanging in the air like a noxious, completely avoidable fog. (Although I did like the use of the fire engine for the title card, foreshadowing the print shop fire…but I’m not sure what that has to do with crème de menthe??)

I am pleased that Claire didn’t actually kill the man outright, but the complication that they create with her immediately reversing course and trying to heal him seems absurd. I can see Claire having qualms about letting him die, and needing to wrap her conscience around it, but actively working to save him when she knows what’s at stake? I don’t know–it doesn’t really feel like Claire. Yes, she has done some very ill-advised things because of her 20th-century sensibilities. But this? I’m having some trouble with it.

ARGH ARCHIE CAMPBELL. I was so hoping we would be excising (haha) that storyline.

Young Ian, be still my heart! I love watching him show his competence so early in the show while bargaining with the tavern owner. These are the seeds of the strong man he will grow up to be, and I’m delighted to witness them.

This episode is pushing the bounds of credulity for me with Claire’s insistence on healing the exciseman. Yes, she is a healer. Yes, she swore an oath when she became a surgeon. But she has killed before when necessary, and made her peace with that. She is, at heart, a pragmatic woman. The episode just barely manages to save itself (for me, anyway)  with the scene after the exciseman died. Barely. But I can see this as being part of Claire readjusting to the realities of the 18th century, and needing some time to accept that she isn’t in Boston with her surgery anymore.

But, let me just point this out: the exciseman dies anyway and gets crated into a barrel, making everything moot, and there are no repercussions for Claire’s actions either way. Which is basically the definition of false conflict. Sigh.

On the other hand, I love, love, love Fergus and Young Ian at the tavern. Their friendship—and the thought of the future they both want to create—is beautiful. Fergus’s teasing really makes them feel like brothers. I’m trying to figure out how old Young Ian is here—I seem to remember him only being fourteen. OK, I just checked. It’s 1766, and he was born in 1752, so that’s right. That seems awfully young to me, but maybe I just can’t remember well enough being that age. I’m sure I felt I was old enough for everything Young Ian wants to do, and I wasn’t living in a period of history that didn’t have the same concept of childhood as we do. Although I think voting age in Scotland is sixteen now, which isn’t that much older than fourteen, and would be considered adulthood for most purposes. But I still had a moment of “he’s just a baby!” especially given the following scenes.

They’re going in a different direction with the Campbells, and I have to say I approve. Archie is definitely taking advantage of his sister, but I’m glad they’re changing him from the ultra-religious Fiend. We can do without that storyline entirely (and, I hope, the attendant problems with Yi Tien Cho), and this way we still have Margaret in the West Indies during the slave uprising without all of the mess of the other storyline.

Speaking of Yi Tien Cho, I’m glad that Claire calls him by his actual name. And that, after that first somewhat problematic scene, they aren’t using him for comic effect or pushing hard on him being Chinese. In this episode he was just a member of Jamie’s crew–if a more trusted one than most–and that was refreshing to see.

Ian’s visit highlights just how much Jamie is lying to everyone. In the first half of the scene, he lies to Ian about his son. In the second half, he admits to lying (by omission) to Claire about his second wife (not that anyone has said those words yet—but in each episode since Claire returned someone has remarked on the thing that Jamie isn’t telling Claire). Claire shines a light on that when they talk upstairs afterward.

Young Ian truly does take after his uncle (in more ways than one…no, it’s not so much like horses, or whores, Ian). He’s fearless, and thinks of the lass first, getting her out of danger. Yes, things rather blow up around him (and unfortunately the man got away with a stack of pamphlets), but he didn’t back down. His storyline is the only real plot that we get in this episode, but it works very well.

Claire and Jamie’s fight seems well-motivated, unlike the earlier arguments over the exciseman. Some of Jamie’s anger, however, is out of proportion to the topic. I think his guilt about Laoghaire is fueling the bitterness and accusations. Not that he says anything he doesn’t mean, but he’s a bit harsher about it than he might otherwise have been.

The print shop fire scene is great, and handles a lot of the plot threads from the book in a more convincing way than the betrayal during the smuggling shipment. But with that said, I am sorely disappointed that Jamie doesn’t save his printing press, even though I’m sure that part would have been impossible to film. The loss of Bonnie is going to cause rather large changes to future events—to lots of future events. The press was a huge part of Jamie’s life—to the point he even named it. So losing that here, while expediting this story and picking up the pace of this particular episode, means losing not only a giant chunk of future storylines, but a whole aspect of Jamie’s life and personality from the books.

This sort of thing is bound to happen in adaptations, but I do mourn the loss. Jamie as writer and printer is one of my favorite incarnations of Jamie. I am glad he saved the miniature of Willie, though.

Ah, now Fergus has actually said the words “other wife.” I’m very surprised that they did that, but I suppose they know that a good percentage of show watchers have already read the books and know what’s coming. And now there’s dramatic irony, since all of the viewers know something Claire doesn’t.

The final shot of Jamie watching the press burn is heart-wrenching, but there’s a lot of other stuff going on, too, and since the show hasn’t articulated his love for the press well, it could be just him mourning one way of life that is now gone, or worrying about what is going to happen next with Claire, Young Ian, and Laoghaire.

Speaking of what happens next–why wasn’t Ian there? If he’s out looking for Young Ian, you’d think a fire would bring him running. I suppose we’ll see him early in the next episode, or Jamie will mention him having already left for Lallybroch, or somesuch.

The “next time on Outlander” segment is spoilerific. They don’t actually use any clips of anyone saying Laoghaire’s name, so at this point all non-reading audiences know is that Jamie married again, but it seems clear enough that this is going to cause major friction and perhaps splintering between Jamie and Claire. I do wonder if Jamie will end up being shot—they show Claire and Jamie on the cliffs (I assume while Young Ian swims out to get kidnapped), but by that point in the book they had basically reconciled. So there are some questions going into next week.

Sorry for the lack of pictures again, and for the very late blog this week. My son has been sick and I had to wait until bedtime to watch the episode and start the blog. Rather than wait another half hour while I do screengrabs and edit them in Photoshop, I’m just going to go ahead and post. But I do intend to try and find an hour this week to add pics to both this blog and the one from last week!

What did you think of this episode? Do you agree with me that it was a lot of false conflict and created problems? What do you think of Jamie’s stance on lies? Let me know in the comments!

Episode 303 – All Debts Paid

Episode 303 Header

This week’s episode has some awesome moments and some great adaptive choices–and some truly terrible ones.

The title card makes me think of pictures of my birthday parties as a kid, even though this would be several decades before my childhood. I had a big black lab, though, so it was nice to see the dog, even if he didn’t show up much otherwise.

I appreciate the chyrons telling us the year in this episode—did I miss that in the last episode? Although they don’t “update” us as time passes in Boston, so that was a little weird. I wish they wouldn’t have started on this conceit of dual time periods. It doesn’t make sense. Last week, we were only a year after Culloden for Claire and seven years later for Jamie. This week, Jamie’s story covers several months, or maybe a year, while Claire’s spans at least ten or so.

The introduction of Lord John was interesting. I understand why they moved the conversation from the offices to the yard (allowing John to see Jamie, and vice versa), but it felt less personal that way between Harry Quarry and John.

Murtagh Fitzgibbons

MURTAGH OMG. I feel so much joy right now, I can’t even describe it. I am so, so glad he didn’t die.

If they replace the role filled by Duncan Innes in the books with Murtagh I will be beside myself with happiness. To get to have him that far into the future would be amazing. Weird that they set up the plaid and then didn’t pay it off, though. Maybe we’ll get that as a flashback later? Or was it just a nod for book readers? But I’ll get to that at the end of the blog.

I kinda hate that Frank and Claire have agreed to an open relationship. Not because I’m against open relationships or polyamory, but because Claire clearly doesn’t want to be in one. Not that she really wants to be married to Frank anymore, either, but it would be better for both of them to divorce and share custody of Brianna. And it’s another way to try and soften Frank as a character. In the book, he still slept around, and was still “discreet,” but without Claire’s—forced? Or feels as though it’s forced?—agreement.

It’s taking a while for any kind of plot to develop in this episode. I was distracted by Murtagh being alive and the implications of that at first, but now I’m wondering when the story is going to start and how it is going to manage to work in both time periods. So far, it just feels like it’s a straight line: this happened, and then this happened, and then this happened.

The Randalls

Now I see–there’s a discussion of divorce, and why they’re not getting one. I’m happy the episode at least engaged with the problem and didn’t flinch away. But it really doesn’t make sense for Frank to disagree. His stab about Claire not keeping her promises is entirely unfounded. She has practically twisted herself into a pretzel to keep her promises to him since coming back to the twentieth century. As she says in their next argument, she has been faithful to him since her return.

It’s still so weird that Arsdmuir is happening at basically one point in time, and we’re jumping forward in huge leaps in Boston. I really can’t understand why they didn’t keep the arc the same as in the books. It made so much more sense to have them searching for clues about Jamie in 1968, and then to see what really happened to him that those clues uncovered—and for Claire to flash back to what was happening to her in the same time, relative to when she returned from Culloden. This is just super awkward, and it doesn’t feel like we’re actually getting a story arc. It’s just a timeline with punctuations.

But oh my GOD, I am so happy that it’s Murtagh in prison with Jamie. It gives him a single person who knows, who can talk to him and unburden his soul. It was something Gabaldon deliberately withheld from him in the book, but for the purposes of the television show it works better giving him someone to talk to. (Edited to add–I meant that it works better because otherwise things we learn in dialogue would have to be given via the dreaded voice over. And no one wants that!)

Jamie and John are SO CUTE and it hurts my heart to know that John is going to fall so hard. And then, to have Jamie recount the meal to the men—who want to hear about every morsel—is even worse (in terms of my heart hurting). All that is left to them is vicarious flavor, and I’m so sad for them. (Note that a commenter misconstrued what I meant here, so let me clarify–I realize that they are excited to hear about Jamie’s meal. But it’s so tragic that they can’t all be out, living their lives, and eating their own good food. That’s why I’m sad for them.)

Turnabout

The aftermath of Jamie’s escape and the juxtaposition of the night at Corrieyairack was good in theory, but I didn’t need the actual flashbacks. I suppose they’re there for anyone who hasn’t watched the previous seasons (although it seems weird to jump in on season three in the post-streaming era. It’s easy to binge-watch seasons one and two on Amazon, the Starz app, or blu-ray). But otherwise, I loved watching the back-and-forth between Jamie and John. The seeds of their future friendship are being sown here, and it’s gorgeous to watch.

I love you so much, John Grey. It takes a special sort of man to earn Jamie’s approval and respect, even if he’s still lying to you. My heart fluttered a bit at the blue sapphire–especially knowing its future. And a special sort of man to honor his debts and send a doctor for Murtagh, even when he could easily have done otherwise. I like watching Jamie’s opinion of him shift and grow.

John and Jamie Chess

I’ve imagined the scene with John and Jamie and the chess game—and John taking Jamie’s hand—so many times, and it definitely lived up to my expectations. So much pain on both sides—so many bad memories, and good ones that hurt because they are memories, and not reality. John is mortified and so full of longing, and Jamie is angry that this new friendship is being marred by demons from his past. I am all-a-tremble, waiting to see Jamie kiss John at Helwater.

It’s weird that Claire and Frank are having this fight about Brianna after she has graduated and is eighteen. Again, it’s trying to make Frank seem reasonable and Claire seem…well…crazy. Because it doesn’t make sense for her to hold on this tight after Bree is grown. She would be leaving for college anyway, and living on her own. It’s part of growing up. So it just makes Claire seem shrewish to fight over where Bree is going to go to college, or to be so possessive of her now that she’s an adult. In the book, the fight made sense. Brianna was still in high school, and Claire rightfully didn’t want to tear her away from her friends in her senior year. It’s so unfathomable why the show has to do this—except that there is obviously a mandate somewhere that Frank Randall must be written as a saint at all times. What the hell?

Trip to Helwater

I wonder if they are going to write out Duncan Innes and use Murtagh in that role. My first assumption is that they will, but I don’t know how they’ll explain him being in Edinburgh when Claire returns. Murtagh didn’t lose his arm and that was the reason for Duncan not to be transported when Ardsmuir closed. Maybe Murtagh escaped and made his way back to Scotland? I suppose we’ll see in two weeks–or next season when we get to America. Next week’s episode is going to deal with Helwater, Geneva Dunsany, and William, but I’m guessing the one after that will be about Jamie going to Edinburgh and getting involved in smuggling. I think they’ll conveniently gloss over the few years at Lallybroch where he married Laoghaire. They won’t want to spoil that surprise for non-book-readers after Claire returns to the 18th century.

I don’t understand why the show cut the flogging, especially after making it seem at the beginning of the episode (at least to book readers) that Jamie was going to take the punishment on Murtagh’s behalf. For those of you who haven’t read the books, in Voyager, it is a young Jacobite in the prison who still has the scrap of tartan, and it’s discovered right after the chess game when John makes his subtle “move” on Jamie. Jamie claims the tartan is his, and John has no choice but to have Jamie flogged—it’s the law. In the book, it’s Jamie’s way of reestablishing their relationship and the power dynamic, which is heavily weighted in John’s favor. And it’s even more of a shock for Jamie when John gets him moved to Helwater. I suppose the story still makes sense without the flogging, but it feels like a missed opportunity.

Lord John Cries

In broad strokes, this episode ended up where I thought it would. I’m more than pleased with the performances by Sam Heughan and David Berry. Lord John is one of my favorite characters in fiction, and although David Berry’s portrayal isn’t exactly like I imagined, he’s pretty damned close. And as the writers said in the post-mortem for the show, he can hold his own with Sam. I can’t wait to see him and Claire meeting on the deck of the Porpoise.

It’s going to sound callous, but wow, am I glad that Frank is dead. I have been consistently frustrated and baffled by the changes made to his character on the show. I am all for wanting to make him into a better man, but in order to make the plot points move in the same direction as the book, they had to shift all of the problems (or most of them) onto Claire. And she doesn’t deserve that. Claire in the books is no saint, and she has many, many flaws. But what they did to her in the show is beyond awful. So yeah, I’m glad Frank is dead. Now we can move on.

Next week, we’re back to Scotland and Roger!! My two favorite characters (Roger and Lord John) will now be on the show at the same time, and that makes me super happy!

What did you think of this week’s episode? Are you also happy Frank is dead? Let me know in the comments!

Episode 302 – Surrender

Episode 302 Header

I think I was a little harsh in my reaction to the opening last week. I re-watched one of the episodes from last season, and it is more different than I thought—it’s just that several of the clips are from previous seasons and so I recognized them. And others are, I think, from this season—but staged as “callbacks” to earlier shots, which made them feel familiar. But the music is tonally different, and I do appreciate the shot of Jamie looking out over the water (I assume we’ll see that in 303 while he’s at Ardsmuir).

I like the wanted poster for the Dunbonnet in the title card. It reminds me of Tangled and all of the posters of Flynn Rider with his nose comically exaggerated.

Jamie and Flynn

I continue to wish that the show would stick to the 18th century. The Lallybroch sections are fantastic—vibrant not only in color palette and tint, but in richness of story. The 20th century bits are at least drawn more directly from the books, but they lack something vital. Those sections feel soulless, void of conflict. I was pissed off at the conflict last week, but at least it felt fraught. This week is just hum-drum, ticking boxes to get back to the 1960s and Claire’s return to Jamie.

I love that the scene with Jamie and the baby hiding from the soldiers was shifted from Maggie to Ian. Jamie protecting Ian from the redcoats establishes that special bond between them that will one day be nearly as close as father and son. I am looking forward to seeing that develop next season–and meeting Rollo!

*Thanks to Zest203 for pointing out my error in memory!

It’s super weird that Claire is the one that initiates intimacy with Frank. I get that when she says “I miss my husband” she’s not really talking about him, but that actually makes it worse. They are still pushing really hard on making all of the problems Claire’s fault, and that’s really pissing me off.

The Smolder

Giving Fergus a little more agency in the scene that leads to his loss of a hand is both heart-breaking and a better choice. In the book, he’s simply delivering something to Jamie. Here, he is deliberately baiting the soldiers. And the scene afterward—where he jokes that he has become a man of leisure—is taken almost directly from the book. Sam and Romann both do an amazing job with it, capturing the humor and love and Jamie’s coming back to himself and remembering the weight of his responsibilities.

Fergus

During the dinner scene with Millie (I guess I heard incorrectly last week, but it was definitely Millie here) and Jerry and the sex scene afterward, I kept wondering where Brianna was. Babies are such convenient sleepers in fiction. But what really bothers me is how they are bashing at Claire for wanting what is so beautifully represented in the scene with Jamie and Mary MacNab—the touch of another human being, bringing pleasure and connection, even if it isn’t part of a great love.

I think the show is trying to contrast the two experiences, but the problem is that one of them is understood between both parties, and the other is one-sided. And that once again puts blame on Claire–she’s “using” Frank because she misses Jamie. Frank plays the longsuffering husband again, saying that when he’s with her, he’s with her, but she’s with Jamie. It’s baffling why the show keeps doing this. I’m OK with having them both be fumbling toward coming back together, and I even understand and sympathize with Claire’s needs. But I wish she would be honest about them, and that Frank would let her. Instead, he stifles her, and then blames her for still loving Jamie.

FUCK. The voice over is back. Damn it. At least it’s brief and only once. But I love the meeting between Claire and Joe. I wish we’d had a little more about her decision to go to medical school and that it wasn’t just voice over. Hell, she could have had a one-sided conversation with baby Bree. I did it all of the time when my kids were babies.

Claire and Joe

Claire and Frank having separate beds is a strange punctuation mark in their relationship. Why not separate rooms?

The scene of Jamie being taken by the redcoats made me weep. Watching Jenny shout at him, and yet seeing the pain and love in their gazes, tore my heart out. And then to cut to Claire, all alone, with memories of the past but no way to regain her lost love, is a poignant counterpoint. Jenny shouts that Jamie gave her no choice and she’ll never forgive him—which is true in a way. Jamie sacrifices for the people he loves. He forced Claire to go back through the stones, and forces his family to accept money in return for his capture. And both Claire and Jenny may technically forgive him, but they’ll never forget what he did.

Jenny Blood Money

The preview for next week makes it look like we’ll get all the way through Ardsmuir and possibly all the way through the Claire flashbacks, since it looks like we’ll see the argument where Frank wants to take Bree to England and ends up dying in a car wreck. And I will be SO HAPPY. Because this show needs to be done with Frank. Then in the episode after that, I assume we’ll be back in the 60s with Bree and Roger, or perhaps we’ll see Claire in Boston deciding to make the trip to Scotland first. Although how they’re going to fill up two episodes with material from the 60s, I don’t know. In my season speculation, I assumed they were going to continue with Claire and Frank through episode four. Maybe they’ll actually spend time developing Roger and Brianna. Or devote an episode entirely to Claire and Joe. We’ll see!

What did you think of episode 302? I’m still feeling decidedly skewed in favor of the 18th century segments with Jamie, and I feel like this episode could have easily cut the 20th century and given more time to digging deep into what happened with Jamie while living in the cave, and made a real arc out of his choice to give himself up for his people. The bones of the story are there, but by giving so much time to Claire and Frank, we lose the depth and complexity of what is happening with Jamie. And that’s unfortunate.

Episode 301 – The Battle Joined

Episode 301 Header

My apologies for not getting this up on the day of the premiere! I was out of the house all weekend and I just got a chance to watch this morning.

Thoughts on the New Intro

There don’t seem to be that many new shots included. And I was kinda hoping we’d get a sweeping ocean view for the new “closing” shot of the intro. But since the episode titles clearly don’t have us setting out to sea until the last quarter of the season, I suppose it makes sense to keep us anchored (haha) in Scotland for a while longer. Next season will have to be different, though!

Title Card - Scottish Flag

Thoughts on the Title Card

The ragged Scottish flag is a good choice. It represents everything that Jamie and Claire fought for last season, and in many ways what she is still fighting for during her pregnancy–to keep that memory alive for her daughter.

General Thoughts on the Episode

I was very pleased with this, overall. If I didn’t know they were keeping Jamie and Claire apart so long, I would be a lot more optimistic about this season, based on this episode.

On that note, I recently read a post in defense of keeping Claire and Jamie separate that talked about all of the other stuff in Outlander that is great and interesting and how people should be focusing on that instead of complaining about J&C not being together. And while it’s true that there is a lot more to this series than just J&C (and we’ll be getting a lot more of that other stuff starting in this season and moving forward), it is also true that Jamie and Claire are the center of Outlander‘s gravity. If we’re talking about favorite characters, mine is Roger MacKenzie, but that doesn’t mean I don’t recognize the importance of Jamie and Claire.

Honestly, I think it’s interesting when they’re apart. I enjoy seeing how they deal with their multiple separations over the years (even the big one where she marries John). I was ready and willing to see three to four episodes with them apart. But six? I mean, they’re going to meet up somewhere in the course of the sixth episode, so it’s only five and a half or whatever, but that’s still nearly twice as long as what I think is warranted by the story.

Do I think the writers can keep things interesting and engaging for those five to six episodes? Sure. But it’s an awful lot of time, and there’s an awful lot of *story* left to tell once they’re finally together.

Getting back to this episode, though…

Jamie remembers a lot more of the battle here than he did in the books, but I’m glad we get to see a bit with Murtagh and more about Charles’ incompetence and the reason the battle went so badly. Later in the episode, Jamie indicates that he doesn’t know what happened to Murtagh after the brief flash of memory he has here, but I wonder if they’ll really make us wait for ages to find out how he died. My guess is not–I’m assuming he’ll figure it out by the end of the season.

Jamie VS BJR

Too much with BJR, though. Knowing he gave Jamie the wound in his thigh that nearly kills him and that Jamie is responsible for BJR’s death changes SO MUCH, removing a lot of nuance from later in the story. But I suppose television doesn’t work as well with nuance, and that they thought viewers would want more closure (as though book readers don’t??).

The image I’ve put above is basically where I would have wanted the fight to end, before we know the outcome. Forgive my Highlander humor–I couldn’t help myself.

Why is it that my favorite part of this post-battlefield section is the rabbit? It’s a little bit mercurial and whimsical, and a nod toward the fact that nature doesn’t really care about our squabbles and strife–until we start destroying habitats and ecosystems.

Jamie’s vision of Claire is poignant and beautiful, but it makes me wonder what DG has planned for the end of the series, and Jamie’s ghost. Unless the show manages to be extended through the full book series, they may never address the ghost again, or they may choose to handle it in a non-book-canon sort of  way, like Game of Thrones is doing now that they’ve gone past the book territory.

Rupert on the battlefield

I LOVE that Rupert is the one who saves Jamie on the battlefield, despite having seen him kill Dougal. It makes so much sense, and vindicates my feelings last season about what Rupert would do in the aftermath of that death.

Claire and Frank’s house in Boston is AMAZING, and I want it. If only my husband would let me buy a house that is more than ten years old. But the problems she has are indicative of why he won’t let me–too many things break and too much money is needed for basic repairs and updates.

I’m not sure about Nellie the next-door-neighbor. It’s nice for Claire to have someone to talk to (although their scene together shows just how much Claire can’t say), but her isolation is her major source of problems during the late 40s and 50s, before she goes back to school to become a doctor. So I don’t know if it’s wise to give her a “chum.”

But with this season, we have entirely broken from the primarily Claire and sometimes Jamie or Frank PoV conceit, and that’s a good thing. The scene from Rupert’s PoV is nice, even though we were in Jamie’s in the book (and arguably are here–I wrote this and then watched through the end of the scene where it shows Jamie watching, even though he couldn’t have seen them from the angle the camera used and perhaps wouldn’t have been able to hear them). I’m very glad that the show gives us a chance to remember everything we loved about Rupert before the inevitable happens.

The scene with Frank’s dean is painful, and reminds me just have far we haven’t come. These sorts of attitudes about women sadly still remain and are being allowed to flourish.

Hal

Hal (Lord Melton) is…a little disappointing on first glance. I wanted him to be a little more charismatic and dashing, because I love the hell out of him in the later stories. But Rupert is still perfect. “Traitors, all.” and “Thank you, milord” for being shot instead of hanged (although it’s true that it’s a cleaner death, especially since this was still the era of torture before hanging for traitors).

The writing in the scene with Claire and Frank at breakfast is fantastic. I love how the superficial humor and fun is such a thin veneer over the raw and aching wound beneath, and the ugly truth that this is not really a marriage.

After that, though, things break down very quickly, and I’m a little annoyed that the scene starts to edge over into pointing fingers at Claire, holding a little too much sympathy for Frank. In this version of events, she is holding back and not engaging (which is absolutely not what happened in the book), and he blames her for that, telling her that it was her choice to come with him and she needs to decide what she wants. Which, in truth, is a reasonable thing to say. On the other hand, this is the 40s, and single mothers were treated even worse then than they are now, so her choices aren’t quite as cut and dried as he’s trying to claim.

Claire and Frank Breakfast

I know that it’s “easier” to blame Frank in the books, because he makes mistakes and ends up doing some unconscionable things. I’m not saying I need that in order to justify Claire’s actions and falling in love with someone else. Even in the books, Claire is torn up about her choices long, long after Frank is dead. But BookFrank was never the right person for Claire, and that truth came out and became more and more clear during the course of their lives together–and would have done even without Jamie.

In the show, we are given a very different Frank–one who, according to what he shouts at Claire, never slept with anyone else. In the books, that isn’t ever proven, but it’s fairly heavily implied, and he canonically has affairs during their time in Boston. In the show, it seems like they’re setting him up to be faithful. Claire’s reticence and coldness, while understandable, doesn’t earn her any sympathy when held up against this man who appears to be bending over backward for her.

In fact, in the book I wanted her to be colder because of just how deep the disconnect was between them on an emotional and mental level. But now that I’ve seen that version play out on screen, I understand why DG made the choices she did. This Claire/Frank relationship is much harder to swallow, with only the tiniest hint that Frank is contributing to their problems.

Rupert and Jamie

The barn scene in the book is not fun by any means, but giving Rupert and Jamie their moment totally ripped my heart out and stomped on it. His memories of Angus and his desire to be reunited with him in heaven is beautiful. I love what Rupert says about Dougal’s death, and his deep sense of pragmatism, loyalty, and love. And you can just see the respect in Hal’s eyes for Rupert, who stayed when he could have run, and stood by his people until the end, accepting death with dignity.

I know the scene with Frank on the couch is supposed to show his frustration and the distance between him and Claire (although why they don’t have a second bedroom, I have no idea), but it made me laugh because my husband is exactly the same way about sounds at night. He has to have a fan running for white noise or complete silence, or else he can’t sleep.

OK, the actor playing Hal (Sam Hoare) is growing on me, rather like the character grew on me in the books. And after checking out his IMDB pic, he is *way* hotter in real life, without the stupid 18th-century wig and side curls. I hope we get to see Hal smoking a bowl with Claire someday.

The delivery scene made me want to go out and burn down the world. Taking her agency away like that was terrifying and terrible and I am so angry. Even during my C-section with my second child, I was awake the whole time. I’m not saying that every childbirth has to be unmedicated and “natural,” but a mother’s wishes should be respected until the point of medical necessity.

Lallybroch

It was a little weird to have Jamie still in the cart at Lallybroch and the driver sitting there while Jenny and Ian are having this emotional moment–and while Jenny is literally hanging off the side of the cart, which can’t be comfortable. Wasn’t she pregnant again at that point, too? Or maybe she’d just had another baby, I can’t remember. In any case, I didn’t really feel anything because the staging was so awkward. But that’s probably just me.

did feel something when Claire woke up, terrified that her baby had died. To have her and Frank come together through the body of Brianna was lovely, but the show did a great job of pressing at the wound in their relationship that is Jamie, and this time giving some of the reticence to Frank, too. I hope that in the future we get a balanced view of the fracture in their marriage. I won’t mind if they’re both shown as being at fault. Claire understandably thinks of her baby’s father when she sees Brianna’s red hair, but Frank is the one who takes it badly. Brianna is a Band-Aid over the wound in Claire and Frank’s marriage, but that’s a terrible position to put a child in, and her existence both pulls them together and keeps them apart.

Claire Frank Brianna A New Beginning

To be fair, Tobias is doing an excellent job with Frank as written for the show. He is a fantastic actor and I’m certainly not bothered by his portrayal–more by what is written for him to do. So don’t take my annoyance with the writers to mean I dislike the actors. They’re doing their jobs and playing the characters as they are written and directed to do.

If you watch the end chat with the writers and Ron Moore, you’ll see Toni Graphia basically saying what I feel about the whole show–one moment with Claire walking across the battlefield to the dying Jamie is much more gripping and important than all of the swords and horses and guns and explosions. The emotions and relationships are what drive Outlander. I think the show forgot that for a little while last season, getting way too much into the war story. But those emotions are coming back now, and I hope that the delay in reuniting Jamie and Claire doesn’t destroy all of the ground made up in this episode.

See you next week!

Updates to the Season Three Page

seasonthreeepisodes

We have episode titles for Season Three, and that means some adjustments to my episode breakdown. I am getting a lot of traffic going to the blog where I did the breakdown and I’ve put a note there to go to the Season Three Speculation page instead.

In the meantime, I want to rant a little about my feelings now that the titles are revealed. Here they are, in case you don’t want to read through the whole breakdown to see them:

  1. The Battle Joined (9/10)
  2. Surrender (9/17)
  3. All Debts Paid (9/24)
  4. Of Lost Things (10/1)
  5. Freedom and Whiskey (10/8)
  6. A. Malcolm (10/22) *note the break here!
  7. Crème de Menthe (10/29)
  8. First Wife (11/5)
  9. The Doldrums (11/12)
  10. Heaven and Earth (11/19)
  11. Turtle Soup (11/26)
  12. The Bakra (The Slave Master) (12/3)
  13. A New World (12/10)

So, if you’ve read the books, you understand why I’m peeved. “A. Malcolm” is clearly the episode where Jamie and Claire are reunited…and it’s halfway through the season.

Any way you look at it, that is just a bad idea. Storytelling-wise, it’s terrible. Even Gabaldon got Jamie and Claire back together before the end of the first third of the book. They are the heart of this series, and if they expect us to stick around through several more seasons as the story starts to splinter, they need to make that heart solid–which is not accomplished by that timeline.

Even looking at it logistically, it doesn’t make sense.

My copy of Voyager has 870 pages. Chapter 23, where Claire travels back to 1766, begins on page 244. I assume the episode will cover material through chapter 25, which ends on page 289. That number divided by six episodes is about 48 pages per episode. There are 580 pages left in the book to be divided over seven episodes–which is a whopping 83 pages per episode.

I don’t even know how they’re going to do that unless they strip out several subplots. Although, to be honest, I wouldn’t mind losing the Fiend storyline, which will save some time both in Edinburgh and at the end–although it will also mean losing the conjuring scene with Margaret Campbell, too.

Some people have also speculated that the season will end on a cliffhanger somewhere before the end of Voyager, but from the title of the last episode I am pretty sure it will end where the book ends. Technically the West Indies are part of the “New World,” but I feel somewhat confident in applying it specifically to America in this instance.

But I’m not even sure how I feel about that, because it means they’re going to try to shove so much of the book into so little episode time.

The only thing to do now, though, is what and see what they do. I wish I believed I could trust the writers implicitly, but they’ve already proved that they don’t always make choices in service of the characters and the story. Sometimes they go for spectacle and shock value, and that’s not interesting to me at all.

*fingers crossed*


Need something to get you through these last few days until Outlander begins? You may like my Fay of Skye series. Set in an alternate Victorian Era, the books are full of magic, romance, Scotsmen, and strong women who know what they want and aren’t afraid to fight for it.

The series starts with Essential Magic. A Theft of Magic and Memories of Magic are already available, and the fourth book, Secret Magic, will be released right after season three ends. Check out Essential Magic now!

Essential Magic ebook 04

eBook
Amazon | iBooks | Kobo | Nook | Google Play
Trade Paperback
Amazon | CreateSpace 

Season Three Premiere Date!

breeandrogerblogheader

OK, so there isn’t an actual date yet, but we do know it will air in September.

EDITED TO ADD: THE OFFICIAL DATE IS SEPTEMBER 10!!

Despite adding about five months to Droughtlander, this is actually a good thing. I feel that some of the problems with Season 2 could have been avoided if they’d had more time during the filming and early production process. So I’m crossing my fingers for some wise decisions to be made about the ship-going and island portion of the story.

Along with the September premiere date, Starz also released a summary of the season (basically the same as the one they already put out, but edited a little), which does not bode well:

The story picks up right after Claire (Caitriona Balfe) travels through the stones to return to her life in 1948. Now pregnant with Jamie’s (Sam Heughan) child, she struggles with the fallout of her sudden reappearance and its effect on her marriage to her first husband, Frank (Tobias Menzies). Meanwhile, in the 18th century, Jamie suffers from the aftermath of his doomed last stand at the historic battle of Culloden, as well as the loss of Claire. As the years pass, Jamie and Claire attempt to make a life apart from one another, each haunted by the memory of their lost love. The budding possibility that Claire can return to Jamie in the past breathes new hope into Claire’s heart… as well as new doubt. Separated by continents and centuries, Claire and Jamie must find their way back to each other. As always, adversity, mystery, and adventure await them on the path to reunion. And the question remains: When they find each other, will they be the same people who parted at the standing stones, all those years ago?

I realize that they’re trying to build up tension, but let’s face it. More than half (if not significantly more than that) of their viewers have read the books, either before the show ever aired, on in response to seeing the show. We all know that Jamie and Claire are going to get back together and Things Will Happen™. So the fact that they’re putting so much emphasis on the time apart makes me think that we’re looking at more than a few episodes of separation.

When I did my season three speculation episode breakdown, I figured on about three episodes before the print shop in Edinburgh. There’s an awful lot to cover during the years apart, particularly for Jamie. But I also wrote my breakdown assuming the series would pick up in 1968 with Bree, Roger, and Claire. Obviously we’re going to get there because we have Joe Abernathy cast, but that summary basically says that the season will start in 1948 and 1746 concurrently.

Sigh. More freaking Frank.

The only good thing I can think of is that, after he’s dead, we will never see him again except in the rare dream/flashback. Same with BJR. And we have at least one more season after this one to live in the blissful world post-Randalls.

Den of Geek has a very comprehensive post about the latest news here.


In other news, I have obviously not yet done my Voyager re-read. I’m a terrible blogger, I know. I’ve been having a rough winter here with illness, injury, accidents, and holidays keeping me away from my keyboard. Plus I have a rather busy writing schedule for my fantasy romance series and a day job. So this blog is on hiatus, barring any Outlander news, for the next few months at least. I’m hoping to come back for the re-read sometime in the summer, a few months before the show returns.

Until then, try to get through Droughtlander as best as you can!

Casting News and a Synopsis

I haven’t posted in a while, sorry! I haven’t had much reading time lately, and my next plan for this blog was to do a series re-read. I actually made it through about a quarter of Outlander and wrote most of a blog post before I gave up. There’s too much on my plate right now.

It was probably a little ambitious when I decided that I could release four books in a year, but I’m pushing to do just that. My next book is out October 17th (you can preorder it here), and I’m looking at February and June of  2017 for books three and four. I’m also working on a serialized prequel to be released on a staggered schedule in between releases. That’s a lot of work!!

But there have been a bunch of casting announcements and I’m totally on board with all of them, so I wanted to jump over here and say how excited I am to see the world of Outlander expanding.

There’s also a season synopsis that is making me re-think my episode breakdown. When I have the time, I will do some adjustments accordingly, but for now, I’ve posted the full text of the synopsis on the Season Three Speculation page.

Now, on to the casting news!

david-berry-headshot

David Berry’s beautiful headshot. Image from EW.com.

David Berry isn’t a perfect match for Lord John Grey, but he is VERY PRETTY. I’ll have to head-canon him down almost a foot though; he’s nearly as tall as Sam Heughan. 🙂 With some highlights to bring him from brown to sandy-blond, he’ll be a good fit.

john-bell-as-bain

John Bell as Bain in The Hobbit movies. Image from theonering.org.

John Bell looks maybe a little too cute to be “homely” Young Ian, but it’s hard to convince studios to hire un-beautiful people. And you can argue that Steven Cree isn’t exactly homely, either, and Jennifer Donnelly is bloody stunning. So we were probably never going to get a plain Ian.

wil_johnson

Wil Johnson. Image from The British Blacklist.

I didn’t have a very good image in my head for Joe Abernathy, except maybe James Earl Jones because of the descriptions of his voice. But now that Wil Johnson’s been cast, he fits seamlessly into my imagination. I can’t wait to see him and Caitriona Balfe chatting about Bree’s real father!

Here’s a link to the EW article about Young Ian and Joe Abernathy, and the one about David Berry.

 

And now we have an Adult Fergus!!

cesar-domboy

César Domboy. Image from Zimbio.

This is César Domboy. I’ll be honest. He looks nothing like the Fergus in my head. But that’s OK, because he both looks like he could be an older Romann Berrux and a possible ancestor of/in the same family tree as Caitriona Balfe, depending on how much you read into the Saint Germain/Percy Wainwright stuff in the later books.

Another possible issue is that he is super young-looking (he’s 26 and looks about 20). Fergus is supposed to be about 30 in 1768. But again, considering that he’s supposed to be an older Romann Berrux, that might work (Romann is 15, playing 9 or 10). And, since Marsali is only 15/16 (I think…I need to check that), casting a younger actor who looks like he’s barely 20 is probably a wise decision.

On a side note, he looks strikingly like my husband. No, really. Like, I could be looking at pictures of my husband from when we met 13 years ago, except with way nicer clothes. It’s pretty crazy. 🙂

Here’s a link to the EW announcement. They also teased a Season 3 reveal of another member of the extended Fraser family. Anyone want to guess who they mean? I’ve got some theories–post yours in the comments!

 

And here’s Marsali!

lauren-lyle

Lauren Lyle. Image from EW.

Lauren Lyle is a relative newcomer, but she looks a lot like Nell Hudson, so as long as she has the acting chops I can totally see this. The EW article announcing her says they are playing Marsali as 18, which I suppose is a good thing, since they are canonically 15 and 30 in the book (in chapter 41 of Voyager, Marsali shouts that she’s 15 and old enough to get married, and Jamie shouts back that Fergus is 30). I’m not sure what they’ll do about Fergus’s age, except ret-conning him younger in Paris, but 18 and 30 isn’t as big a gap (especially since it makes her legally an adult in American culture) as 15 and 30.

And now we have the Dunsany sisters, Mr. Willoughby (sigh) and Captain Leonard!

First, the Dunsanys:

On the left is Hannah James playing Geneva. On the right is Tanya Reynolds playing the younger Isobel.

All I can say is…wow. I mean, they’re pretty close to what I imagined in the books, but I was kinda hoping they would cast up in age. According to Tanya’s agency page, she’s supposed to be cast in ages 21-25 roles, but looks about like she’s 14. Hannah James is 24 but looks 16. I forget the girls’ actual ages in the books, but I think that’s pretty close. And it has always, always bothered me that Jamie actually goes through with it with Geneva, a minor (which is not even to engage with the fact that she says no…there are plenty of other people talking about that elsewhere in the fandom). And afterward, they do it again (at least she actually asks him that time…but still…a minor). It wouldn’t have killed them to cast an actress who actually looks like she’s in her 20s and then have the character actually be 19 or 20. Despite fictional accounts of teenage brides and stories of being “on the shelf” by 20, the average age for marriage throughout most of the last several hundred years has ranged from the early to late twenties.

So the fact that these ladies will be marrying much older men (Isobel marries Lord John) is kinda squicky. But much more squicky is the fact that there will almost certainly be a sex scene between Jamie and Geneva. And Sam is 36, and looks it. I can’t remember off the top of my head exactly how old Jamie is then, but that’s probably about the right age. So just..eww.

Moving on, we have the problematic character of Mr. Willoughby and the milquetoast but annoying-when-it-counts Captain Leonard.

On the left is Gary Young, playing Mr. Willoughby. The reports so far are calling him “well-versed in Eastern medicine” which was actually not true in the book (he spent some time with healers, but it wasn’t his job), so maybe they’re already going in a different direction? Not that we need another stereotypical portrayal of a wise Asian healer/mystic in pop culture, but I’ll take that over the drunkard with weird sexual fetishes.

On the right is Charlie Hiett. He looks pretty close to my mental image of Captain Leonard. The character isn’t around that much in the books, but maybe his role will be bigger in the show. He was annoying and more of a plot point than a character, so ultimately forgettable. Let’s hope the actor brings something new to the role.

 

Speculation – Season Three Episode Breakdown

seasonthreeepisodes

EDIT: With the episode titles now released (as of late August), this post is kinda obsolete. It remains an example of how *I* would have broken down the episodes, but for my up-to-date speculation, please visit the “Season Three Speculation” page where I’ve updated based on the episode titles.


You guys, this took a really, really long time to do. I have HUGE amounts of sympathy for the Outlander writers.

Although I followed the book exactly, I don’t think they will. At least, I hope they won’t. I’ve broken up the book into more-or-less equal chunks, and I haven’t deviated from the plot at all. But many of those chunks don’t hold together, narratively-speaking. There isn’t a strong sense that these are individual stories making up a bigger story. Some work as individual pieces, and others don’t work at all when taken on their own. So I really hope the season doesn’t end up looking exactly like this!

When Season Three starts, I’ll update each episode breakdown after it airs, so that this page will stand as a summary for the season. (The Season Two summary is here, and eventually I’ll do a Season One summary. Eventually!)

UPDATE:

Starz/Tallship have released a synopsis for the season. Here it is:

“Book Three” will be based on the third of the eight books in the Outlander series, entitled Voyager, The third season of “Outlander” picks up right after Claire travels through the stones to return to her life in 1948.  Now pregnant, she struggles with the fallout of her sudden reappearance and its effect on her marriage to her first husband, Frank.  Meanwhile, in the 18th century, Jamie suffers from the aftermath of his doomed last stand at the historic battle of Culloden, as well as the loss of Claire.  As the years pass, Jamie and Claire attempt to make a life apart from one another, each haunted by the memory of their lost love.  The budding possibility that Claire can return to Jamie in the past breathes new hope into Claire’s heart… as well as new doubt.  Separated by continents and centuries, Claire and Jamie must find their way back to each other.  As always, adversity, mystery, and adventure await them on the path to reunion.  And the question remains: when they find each other, will they be the same people who parted at the standing stones, all those years ago?

source-Starz via outlandertvnews.com

What does this mean for my episode breakdown? Well, it means we’re probably not going to get the 1960s in Episode One. I always knew they would do flashbacks to Frank (and Bree’s childhood), but I’d hoped they would be just that–flashbacks–not the primary action for the Claire half of the episodes. So I’m a little disappointed, but I can’t say I’m surprised. Ron Moore’s love affair with Frank continues!

UPDATE #2: And with BJR, apparently. This EW slideshow has a quote saying that they’ve filmed more of the battle of Culloden than was represented in the book. So maybe we’ll actually see BJR die. Not sure how I feel about that.

UPDATE #3 – So, despite my having read in one of Maril Davis’s interviews that there would again be 13 episodes this season, I have heard elsewhere that there will only be 10. That means I have to totally re-think this breakdown. There has also been talk that Claire and Jamie won’t be reunited until halfway through the season. Which is baffling. In any case, what is represented here is what happens in the book. So take that as you will!
UPDATE #3A – Also, IMDB now has 13 episodes listed and I’ve seen in several places where the writers/producers refer to 13 episodes. So I think that we’re firm on 13. However, there are also three tentative titles on IMDB. They are highly suspect, since it’s only episodes 3, 4, and 5 that have titles, but the episode 5 title, “Freedom and Whiskey” makes me think that that will be the episode when Jamie and Claire are reunited. A whole episode later than I’d have wanted, but two episodes earlier than I feared. WHEW.  NOPE. See next update. Sigh.

UPDATE #4 – We now have the complete season episode titles, and that changes things. For one thing, the fact that episode 6 is titled “A. Malcolm” makes it pretty clear that Jamie and Claire won’t be reunited until HALFWAY THROUGH THE SEASON. WTF? To say I am unhappy about this news is something of an understatement. For reference, Claire returns to the 18th century in chapter 23 of the book, which begins on page 244 of the hardcover edition I have. The book is 870 pages. A very modest understanding of math tells me that Claire returns well before the first third of the book is over (page 290). So I have no idea what they’re going to do with the extra 350 pages of the book. Even more egregious is that it looks like they’ve added another “not from the books” episode, likely dealing with Jamie as a smuggler before Claire returns. I just can’t even right now.

OK, here goes:

Outlander Season Three Episode Breakdown

EPISODE ONE  – THE DUNBONNET

  • 1746
    • Jamie wakes after Culloden. Black Jack Randall’s dead body lies on top of him. Some other Highlanders find him and they hide in a cottage. But the English find them. The major in charge is one Lord Melton – the older brother of John William Grey. In exchange for saving John’s life, Hal spares Jamie’s, and sends him back to Lallybroch.
  • 1968
    • Roger and Bree convince Claire not to go jump through the stones immediately. They should try to track Jamie down in history first, so she knows where to go, and can be certain that he didn’t die.
  • 1746
    • Jamie arrives at Lallybroch. He is very badly wounded and his leg is infected. Jenny scalds it with boiling water and he survives.
  • 1968
    • Bree finds the story of the Dunbonnet
  • 1746-1752
    • Jamie lives in the cave. He comes down from time to time. Ian is imprisoned in the Tollbooth. Jenny has her baby and the soldiers come. She lies and says the baby has died to protect Jamie hiding with the bairn in the wardrobe.
  • 1968
    • Roger receives a packet from the historian Linklater with passages from Hal’s journal. Claire flashes back to 1949/1950 when Bree was a baby and remembers the ruined dinner party.
  • 1752
    • Fergus loses his hand when he tries to protect Jamie from a British patrol. Jamie decides it is time to give himself up in exchange for the reward money. Mary MacNab visits him in the cave.
  • 1968
    • Fiona tells the story she knows of the Dunbonnet and how he gave himself up and went to prison so that his people could live off the reward money. They decide to start looking at prison rolls.

EPISODE TWO – ARDSMUIR

  • 1968
    • Claire talks about becoming a doctor; flashbacks to trouble balancing motherhood and medical school – Frank takes Bree with him to work; Roger talks about becoming a historian. Claire finds Jamie on a roll at Ardsmuir.
  • 1755
    • Harry Quarry turns the prison over to its new governor, Lord John Grey. LJG realizes he has Jamie in his power, but resolves to avoid him. Jamie is known now as MacDubh, and is pretty much the laird of Ardsmuir. All of the men look to him.
    • A man is found, delirious and speaking in Gaelic. Lord John must ask Jamie to translate because the one thing they know is that he speaks of French gold. Jamie agrees to a bargain. Jamie learns more than what he tells John, and keeps exactly to the bargain while still escaping. He finds gems and coins, and hides them on an island, but when John blackmails him, he tells him he threw the gems into the sea. He produces a single gem that he swallowed. He says he ran because he was hoping for some sign that his wife was still alive.
    • John and Jamie begin having meals together and playing chess. John falls in love with Jamie, but Jamie can’t abide another man’s touch after BJR.
    • After they part in anger, Jamie takes a flogging that should have been given to another man. John thinks Jamie is doing it to hurt him. Jamie is doing it to remind him of their relative positions in the world, and because that’s what lairds do.
    • Even wounded and surrounded by his men, Jamie is still fundamentally alone.
  • 1968
    • Roger finds Jamie’s pardon. Claire goes back to Boston.

EPISODE THREE – HELWATER (TITLE PER IMDB–NOT TRUSTWORTHY–ALL DEBTS PAID)

  • 1968/1950s
    • Flashback to Claire meeting Joe Abernathy. Claire visits her house and flashes to the night Frank died, after he told her he was leaving her and taking Bree.
  • 1756
    • Jamie and John arrive at Helwater.
    • ???Lord John mysteries???
  • 1758
    • Geneva Dunsany stalks Jamie; blackmails him into sleeping with her before her wedding.
    • Geneva dies giving birth to baby William. Jamie kills Lord Ellesmere to save his son’s life.
    • Events of the Scottish Prisoner??
  • 1761/2
    • Jamie realizes that William is starting to look like him. He already knows that the Dunsany’s suspect William’s parentage, but they are grateful to him for saving the boy’s life, and offer to help him however they can. Jamie finally asks John and them to get him a pardon so he can go back to Scotland.
    • Jamie leaves Helwater, and baptizes his son before he goes. He gives him the baptismal name “James” and gives him his wooden rosary.
  • 1968
    • Claire closes her house in Boston and visits Joe. She helps him with some bones found in the Caribbean; these are the bones of Gillian Edgars/Geillis Duncan…and the wound in her skull is one Claire herself will/has already inflicted. TIME TRAVEL WIBBLY WOBBLY.
    • Claire confesses everything to Joe. He tells her she should go back (except that in the show Claire had absolutely no reservations…maybe their meeting will go differently?)

EPISODE FOUR – A. MALCOLM, PRINTER (TITLE PER IMDB–NOT TRUSTWORTHY–OF LOST THINGS)

  • 1968
    • Roger finds Jamie’s folio and the anachronistic Burns reference. Claire plans her trip. Goes through the stones.
  • 1766
    • Claire travels to Edinburgh and goes to the print shop. Jamie thinks she’s a ghost, then faints when he realizes she’s real. When he wakes, Claire shows him photos of Brianna.
    • Jamie rushes off to take care of Mr. Willoughby. *sigh* Willoughby causes a scene and they have to run to a brothel where Jamie has a room. Misunderstandings abound.
    • Claire and Jamie dance around the awkwardness of 20 years apart, and finally come together.
    • But Jamie is keeping a secret. Claire senses it, although she’s distracted by discussions of smuggling, and by speaking once again to him of Brianna.

EPISODE FIVE – UP IN FLAMES (TITLE PER IMDB–NOT TRUSTWORTHY–FREEDOM AND WHISKEY)

  • In the morning, Ian arrives and more misunderstandings commence. Ian is shocked to see Claire, and tells them he’s come to retrieve his son, Young Ian.
  • Ian and Jamie go out, and while they’re gone, Young Ian shows up. Claire tells him his father is in town, and he runs off, believing Claire to be a prostitute that Jamie and Ian have both visited.
  • Claire has breakfast with the brothel ladies. She learns about a Fiend that has been killing women. She meets Fergus as an adult, who is quickly whisked away by Jamie to deal with their smuggling cargo.
  • Willoughby kills a man who claims to be an exciseman and accosts Claire. His body is disposed of in a wine cask, and Claire finds out that Young Ian is working with Jamie.
  • Jamie takes Claire to dinner and is warned off his usual smuggling route by Sir Percival Turner. They make love in a private dining room and he explains how he became a printer.
  • On their way back to the brothel, they see smoke – it’s Jamie’s printing press. He goes in and rescues it and Young Ian. After they’re all safe, Young Ian tells two versions of his day. In one, he follows a suspicious man into the print shop and sets the fire to stop the man from getting some seditious pamphlets. But really, he was fighting with the man, and had thrown a small lead forge at him. He thinks he has killed a man.
  • Fergus takes Young Ian to drown his sorrows with a lass.
  • In the morning, everyone goes to confession except Claire, who goes to get medical supplies from an apothecary and meets Reverend Campbell. She arranges to meet with his sister, who was severely traumatized post Culloden. She was once betrothed to a friend of Jamie’s.
  • Jamie and Fergus decide to go to the second rendezvous point to meet their cargo, but everything goes wrong and their party is separated. The excisemen have been killed, and Jamie and his people set up for the crime. But they all manage to escape and head back to Lallybroch.

EPISODE SIX – YOU CAN’T GO HOME AGAIN

  • At Lallybroch, Young Ian is castigated by his parents and Jenny reacts to Claire’s return. Ian makes Jamie give Young Ian his punishment as a way to punish them both.
  • Jamie tells Claire the true story of the seal cove and the treasure – he didn’t throw it into the sea as he told John Grey. The treasure is still there, with gemstones and ancient coins.
  • Claire and Jamie are interrupted mid-coitus by Marsali MacKimmie and Laoghaire Fraser. Claire gets understandably upset, and she and Jamie argue. They have angry, loud sex until Jenny comes in and tosses water on them. While Jamie is gone, Jenny helps Claire clean up and leave.
  • Halfway to Craigh na Dun, Young Ian catches up to Claire. Jamie has been shot by Laoghaire and is dying.
  • Claire returns, and uses some of her precious penicillin to keep him from dying from fever after the gunshot wound. They are both still angry, but Jamie explains how the marriage happened, and how it had failed.
  • All of the Murray family arrives, and Claire enjoys the company. Soon Laoghaire, her brother, and Ned Gowan come to tell Jamie that they are suing him. A settlement is reached, but in order to pay Laoghaire, Jamie must go fetch a jewel from the seals’ cove. They take Young Ian and plan to go to Paris and stay with Jared, where Ian can go to school.
  • But at the seals’ cove, Young Ian is taken by men on a rowboat, along with the treasure.

EPISODE SEVEN – FORCES OF NATURE

(NOTE – I would totally cut all of the stuff in France)

  • In France, Jared puts Jamie in charge of the Artemis and they get ready to sail after the Bruja, the ship that took Young Ian. It’s headed for the West Indies.
  • While in France, they meet with one of the Rothschilds, who indicates that coins matching the ones in the treasure were owned by the Duke of Sandringham.
  • Even though they go separately in the book, I would absolutely have Claire and Jamie go together to visit Faith’s grave. And Claire will speak with Mother Hildegarde, but Master Raymond is gone.
  • They return to Scotland to pick up their crew, made up of the smugglers (because Jamie suspects one is a traitor), and Fergus brings Marsali MacKimmie (Laoghaire’s oldest daughter) on board. They are handfast, but have not yet consummated the wedding. Jamie wants to put her ashore, but Fergus insists that she stay. Jamie says they must not sleep together until their union can be blessed by a priest – which means probably months away, after crossing the ocean.
  • Jamie succumbs to seasickness. Claire makes friends with the ship’s cook, Murphy. Fergus tells Claire that someone has been trying to kill Jamie – there have been a few “accidents” recently. They think it’s one of the men on board, except for Duncan Innes, who is one of Jamie’s Ardsmuir men who lost his arm in prison and doesn’t want Jamie dead.
  • Jamie’s seasickness gets worse until Mr. Willoughby tries acupuncture. (If the character is written out, which would be helpful, Claire could have gotten this knowledge elsewhere). Claire and Jamie sit up and talk about the future – moon landings, and Bree. Jamie looks at the pictures and wonders about what kind of woman she is. Claire says she left a letter, with all of the advice she could think to give.
  • Jamie is feeling the effects of celibacy, since Fergus is in his cabin and Marsali is in Claire’s, and there’s no good place for them to have sex. They talk about what it was like for him in prison. The next day, they find a spoiled cask and throw it out to lure sharks. Murphy relishes the thought of cooking them, since one got his leg. Mr. Willoughby catches a pelican to fish for him. He tells the crew of his escape from China.
  • Marsali and Claire start to warm up to each other, and Marsali talks about her relationship with Fergus and his past. She also asks how not to get pregnant, because she thinks that having babies is what made her mother dislike sex. Claire shows her how to use sponges (not that those are all that effective).
  • While they are talking, a commotion on board signals the arrival of a British man-o-war.

EPISODE EIGHT – WE MEET A PORPOISE

  • The man-o-war has typhoid fever aboard. Claire can’t get it, and wants to help. Jamie is reticent, but she’s insistent, citing her Hippocratic Oath, and hopes it will stop them from pressing too many sailors from the Artemis.
  • Claire starts to get things in order aboard the Porpoise, and they set sail with her still on board. The captain is apologetic, but they must make haste.
  • Claire treats the typhoid epidemic, and her days begin to blur in exhaustion. She becomes friends with the gunner’s wife, Mrs. Johansen, when she needs milk for her patients.
  • Claire goes to speak with the captain one day and he accidentally calls her “Fraser” (she’s using the name Malcolm). He has to leave, and she reads from his logbook that one of the men on board gave him information about Jamie and his smuggling activities.
  • Claire tracks down Harry Tompkins, none other than the man who Young Ian thought he killed. (In the book, he finds her, but I think that robs her of some agency). She withholds medical treatment in exchange for information, and finds out that Sir Percival was behind everything in Edinburgh.
  • One night, she goes on deck and meets the passenger that is responsible for the haste – the new governor of Jamaica, Lord John William Grey. He doesn’t know who she is, and she doesn’t remember him. But they speak about what it feels like to have to watch men die and only being able to do so much, and the responsibility of it. He says, “What it comes to, I think, is the knowledge that you are not God….And the very real regret that you cannot be.”

EPISODE NINE – LAND HO!

  • Claire escapes the Porpoise by jumping overboard and floating on a current between islands. She washes ashore and meets an elderly priest who is quite mad named Father Fogden, and a naturalist named Lawrence Stern. Who coincidentally knows Jamie. Because who doesn’t know Jamie?
  • Claire learns about a cave called Abandawe on Hispaniola, which is considered sinister and sacred. She also learns that Father Fogden has been defrocked because he ran away with an upper class woman named Ermenegilda from Habana, Cuba.
  • The Artemis runs aground, but Jamie isn’t with the ship. The sailors and Claire try to get it back in the water.
  • Jamie got aboard the Porpoise, but Claire was already gone. Then he was imprisoned, and during a storm, Mrs. Johansen got him overboard. He washes up on a beach and pretends to be French when he meets some island children. They tell him that the Bruja—and Ian—have recently been in port.
  • A group of soldiers arrives at Artemis. Jamie is with them, and tells them that if they get the ship into the water they can have it. But he double-crosses them, and his men launch the ship and take the soldiers prisoner.
  • Claire de-louses Jamie and his beard. Marsali and Fergus are “officially” wed by Father Fogden. Jamie gives Fergus the name Fraser. The wedding reminds Claire of her choice to be with Jamie.

EPISODE TEN – WORLDS UNKNOWN

  • The Artemis hauls bat guano from Barbados to Jamaica to a certain Mr. Grey’s sugar plantation.
  • Jamie speaks with Master Masons in the West Indies asking about news of Ian and the Bruja.
  • Claire freaks out when she sees a slave auction and causes a scene. The only way to get out of it without violence is for Jamie to purchase the man, Temeraire.
  • But they do learn something at the auction site – the Bruja’s cargo included some slaves with previous owners. One is a Mrs. Abernathy of Rose Hall, Jamaica. They plan to head there to unload their cargo and speak to her. But first, they have to check the pile of dead bodies ready for burning, in case Ian died aboard the ship and was unloaded there. The experience triggers Jamie’s PTSD about Culloden.
  • Claire tries to free Temeraire, but the others argue that he won’t be able to make a living as a one-armed former slave. (This SUPER bothers me, and I hope the show cuts it).
  • The pirates from the Bruja board the Artemis. Claire is wounded trying to save her and Marsali’s lives. Jamie and Fergus have the unusual experience of doctoring Claire, but Mr. Willoughby sews her up.
  • Claire says that her wound hurts, and Jamie says that he was worried because she didn’t think it hurt when it happened. That mortal wounds don’t hurt. She asks how he knows, and he says Murtagh told him. Then he tells her what he remembers of Culloden and how Murtagh died.
  • Claire learns that they have a prisoner from the Bruja. Claire patches him up and eventually he tells them his name is Ishmael and he’s from one of the islands. He tells them about the 12 Scots boys in the hold of the ship. Claire drifts into a kind of trance while he talks, and thinks that he might be an ancestor of her friend Joe Abernathy. (I am assuming this is some kind of time-traveler skill, like the way she can diagnose things by touching). This seems to mesh with the fact that her unwanted slave was owned by someone named Abernathy and that Ishmael has removed a brand from himself that was in a similar location to Temeraire’s.
  • Claire’s wound gets infected and she has Jamie inject her with penicillin. He can’t do it at first, and she has to start it herself. But when he sees how much it hurts, he takes over. Claire tells him about a patient that she helped commit suicide in Boston. Shortly after that, she was moved up to administration so she would have little patient contact. That was right before she went to Scotland with Bree and found out Jamie was alive.
  • Jamie and Claire discuss the future, and possibly moving to America. Jamie could become a printer in one of the larger cities. Murphy sends Claire some turtle soup laced heavily with sherry. Claire gets quite tipsy and she and Jamie have fever-drunk sex, during which Mr. Stern tries to come in and Jamie attempts to tell him nicely to go away, but ends up shouting at him. (This is many people’s favorite sex scene in all of the books).

EPISODE ELEVEN – PROMISED LAND

  • When the Artemis arrives in Kingston, Jamaica, the Porpoise is there. Claire explains that they were bringing the new governor. When Jamie hears the name, he explains that they’re friends, and that John was in charge of Ardsmuir Prison.
  • Ishmael and Temeraire head into the hills of Jamaica, most likely to join with a band of Maroons.
  • The Frasers settle in at Jared’s plantation. They learn that Reverend Campbell has arrived, and that there is gossip about Mrs. Abernathy and the way Mr. Abernathy died. They also find out that there’s a ball being held to welcome the new governor. Jamie decides to attend.
  • Since Jamie is a wanted man, they decide to masquerade as French couple – Etienne Alexandre and his wife, Claire. John finds Claire first, and is pleased to see her. She introduces her husband, and John is floored to realize it’s Jamie. And that this isn’t any woman, this is his lost wife, Claire.
  • Claire mingles and gossips and finds out that everyone thinks Mr. Abernathy perished under suspicious circumstances. Reverend Campbell is there, and goes on a diatribe about the Jacobites. His sister is missing, and he wants help from the governor to find her.
  • Jamie and John meet privately. Claire overhears them talking, and witnesses them embracing, and sees the way John looks at Jamie – and how much Grey is in love with her husband.
  • Claire can’t face Jamie, because she can’t reconcile his friendship with a man who is in love with him with his past with BJR. So she goes to the retiring room and stumbles upon a dead woman. The assumption is that Mr. Willoughby killed her, so as his friend, Jamie is questioned. Fergus takes Marsali home, and Claire speaks with John. The captain of the Porpoise arrives and Claire pretends a swoon so she won’t be recognized. John plays along until the captain leaves. Claire is still jealous, and she and John talk, and John mentions Willie. Claire has no idea who he means, until he shows her the portrait of the little boy. John explains what he knows of the circumstances of William’s birth.
  • Flashback to Helwater, and the day Jamie asked John to look after William. He offers himself in exchange, and although it is what John wants more than anything in the world, he turns down the offer. It is beneath his honor, and Jamie’s. But Jamie kisses him before he goes.
  • Back in Jamaica, John says that he ought to have recognized her, and reminds her of the night before Prestonpans. Then John says one of my absolute favorite lines from the series, about how he feels about Jamie: “To know that you cannot give them happiness, not through any fault of yours or theirs, but only because you were not born the right person for them?” And of course, Claire does know that. It is her relationship with Frank, exactly. When they part, they acknowledge that they liked each other at their first meeting on the Porpoise. Now, there is something very big and awkward between them – their love for Jamie Fraser.
  • Claire and Jamie talk about William. Jamie explains the circumstances of William’s birth, and talks about loneliness, and longing, and how that is why he married Laoghaire. He thinks it may be what Willoughby felt and why he might have murdered the girl. He also explains that he didn’t tell her about William because he’d have to tell her about Geneva, and how would she believe that he has only ever loved her? But she says, if he tells her, she’ll believe him, because she loves him, and will keep him honest. They reaffirm their marriage vows.

EPISODE TWELVE – THE SCENT OF GEMSTONES

  • Jamie and Claire visit Rose Hall. Mrs. Abernathy is actually Geillis Duncan/Gillian Edgars. She plays coy, and talks to Claire about time travel, the Rising, and how she survived being burned as a witch. She escaped to France and tried to help the Rising there. She also talks about zombies – men who have been drugged and made susceptible to suggestion. Jamie goes to help on the estate in an attempt to look around, and Claire tries to help with healing some of Geillis’s house slaves. Claire tries to question the house girls about Ian, but they won’t talk. When she goes back to see Geillis, she is looking at the pictures of Brianna. Then she realizes that Claire has gone through the stones three times. Geillis has the gemstones from the seals’ cove, and is keeping them in case she needs to travel again.
  • As Jamie and Claire leave, Reverend Archie Campbell arrives. They come back at night, to find Campbell still there and Geillis gone. Campbell is suspicious, but talks to her about the Brahan Seer prophecies (note – important for later in the series!). Mr. Willoughby arrives and tells Claire that Archie is the Fiend from Edinburgh who was killing women, and is the one who killed the girl at the ball. Mr. Willoughby kills Campbell, and admits that he is the one who gave away Jamie back in Edinburgh. Then he flees.
  • Claire searches for clues to where Geillis has gone. The clue is the prophecy that the line of Lovat will produce Scotland’s next ruler. And the only person alive in the 20th century from Lovat’s line is Brianna Randall. Geillis is going back.
  • Claire tries to meet back up with Jamie and Lawrence Stern, but stumbles onto some slaves instead. They are about to rise up against the plantation owners, and are summoning spirits. They have Margaret Campbell with them, and she is the mouthpiece for their summoning. During the ceremony, she even channels Brianna, who speaks to Jamie and Claire. Jamie makes Ishmael tell them where Geillis has gone—to the cave of Abandawe, on Hispaniola. They run toward Ian, while the escaped slaves begin their uprising.

EPISODE THIRTEEN – VOYAGER

  • John offers Jamie his boat, and Jamie says they’ll have to steal it so John won’t be implicated. John offers Claire sanctuary, but Claire must go to Abandawe. John misunderstands, and Claire wishes she could tell him the truth, but he is hurt when he says goodbye.
  • Jamie forces Fergus to stay behind with Marsali, and then they set off for Hispaniola. On the boat, they discuss philosophy with Stern, and religion, and science. Duncan Innes takes control of the ship while they go inland.
  • Claire starts having visions of Geillis, and is drawn toward Abandawe. In the cave, Jamie holds tightly to her in the darkness, because they are both afraid she will be drawn back into the time passage.
  • Geillis has Ian – she planned to kill him and use his blood to pass through time. When Geillis threatens Brianna, Claire goes into a blood rage, and kills Geillis with the axe she meant to use on Ian.
  • Ian, Jamie, and Claire manage to get out of the cave and into the storm with the gemstones, but Claire and Ian are terrified.
  • Lawrence leads them back to the jungle, and Claire treats Jamie’s wound, only to find he has a pistol ball in his scalp. She removes it, then goes into shock. When she wakes, she hears Ian telling Jamie about what happened at Rose Hall, and how the other boys had all died. Then I really, really, hope that they don’t keep the part with Geillis raping Ian, but if they do, I hope they treat it as rape, and without any overtones that Ian wanted it or participated willingly.
  • If Geillis rapes Ian, Claire treats him with penicillin, as she believes Geillis was suffering from advanced syphilis. Then they go back to the coast.
  • There, they meet the men, and get back on the boat, which is being pursued by the Porpoise. They were really after the escaped slaves on a different ship, but would be happy enough to recover their governor’s stolen vessel.
  • The Porpoise chases them into a hurricane. They manage to get through the storm (the Porpoise is swamped and goes down with all hands, including Captain Leonard), but have no idea where they are. Eventually, they sight land, and shortly after that, the topmast snaps and drags Claire into the water. She’s tangled in rigging and her leg breaks. Jamie jumps in and brings her to shore.
  • Claire wakes up in a house, and when they ask the owners where they are, they find out they’re in Georgia. They’ve made it to America. And for the first time since Claire came back to him, Jamie is able to openly and honestly introduce himself as Jamie Fraser, and his wife, Claire.

THE END!!

Frequently Searched Queries

outlanderstones

It is taking me longer than I’d hoped to figure out how to break Voyager into 13 episodes. We’re doing some remodeling, and between that and my own writing, I have only finished breaking 4. But I should be able to devote some extra time to it this week, so I’m planning to have it out next weekend.

In the meantime, I decided to put together this post. I’ve gone through the search terms that lead people to this website, and have put together answers to some of the most frequently searched-for terms and queries. Most of these answers are somewhere in the blog, but will be difficult to find because of the format. If your question isn’t here, ask it in the comments and I’ll add it to the post!

Outlander Spoilers Frequently Searched Queries

  1. Outlander book 9 spoilers
    1. As I mentioned in the sticky post, no one has these except Diana Gabaldon and anyone she uses for beta reading/editing. But my guess is that some of the events chronicled will include the battles of King’s Mountain and Cowpens.
  2. Why did Jamie Fraser not die at Culloden?
    1. We don’t really know. The show may come down one way or another (especially since Ron Moore has now revealed that they’re filming part of the battle), but in the books Jamie doesn’t remember most of the battle. He was badly wounded, and woke up with Black Jack Randall’s corpse laying on him. It is possible/probable that BJR’s body kept Jamie from view, and that kept him from being killed after receiving his wound. But he doesn’t remember being wounded, and doesn’t know if it was BJR who did it. He also doesn’t know how BJR died – if it was at his hand, or someone else’s.
    2. Part two of this answer is that, even though Jamie survived the battle, he managed to escape because of Lord John Grey. That young boy who infiltrated their camp before the battle of Prestonpans (who said his name was William Grey) had an older brother, Hal, who happened to be in charge of the troops that found the Highlanders hiding in the cottage near Culloden. Hal gave Jamie his life in return for sparing John’s.
    3. Part three of this answer is Jenny Fraser Murray, who saved her brother’s life by scalding his wound with boiling water and killing the infection.
  3. Black Jack Randall Queries:
    1. Black Jack Randall book
      1. Not sure if this one is just wondering how he’s different in the book, or if someone actually wants to read a whole book about BJR. I don’t think there’s going to be a book, but I do think his character was less overtly evil and demonic in the book than on the show. Not that he wasn’t awful. He was. But I think his characterization in the book was more nuanced and layered. No one is entirely evil, and the book presented us with additional aspects of BJR that could be understood and even sympathized with, while 100% hating everything he did to Jamie and others.
    2. What happened to BJR/When does BJR die/Does Jamie kill him?
      1. He dies/died at Culloden (April 16, 1746), as Claire predicted. In the book, he has a headstone at St. Kilda’s, but it is unclear whether his body actually lies there or not. I may be getting confused because Frank had Rev. Wakefield put up a fake headstone for Jamie there, and I can’t remember if both stones were fake or just Jamie’s.
      2. We don’t know if Jamie killed him or not, because Jamie doesn’t remember. The show may choose to show us what happened (they’re filming part of the battle), or may follow Diana’s example and obscure the truth for many seasons to come.
    3. Black Jack Randall and Claire
      1. I hope this wasn’t a shipping-related query. In the book, they have a strange connection that is never precisely defined. It is antagonistic, of course, from the moment she passes through the stones, and gets worse after everything he does for the next two years. By the end she hates him with a furious passion, which doesn’t lessen over the years (as shown by her reaction to seeing his grave in the 1960s- something that didn’t happen in the show yet).
    4. Why does Black Jack beat Alex after his death?
      1. You’ve got me. I think it’s because Alex was the last thing holding him back from descent into true darkness. But you’d have to ask the writers and Tobias Menzies to know for sure!
  4. Murtagh Fraser spoilers
    1. Most of these boil down to- is he going to die at Culloden? Honestly, I don’t know. He does in the books, but the show has made him a much more important character. I imagine that the show will follow the books in this regard, though, because it’s the way he would want to die. He wouldn’t want to be hanged as a traitor, starve to death, or be transported to America. And if he survives Culloden, he would be separated from Jamie of necessity, which would be worse than death for him.
  5. What happens to Mary Hawkins?
    1. In the books, she marries a Jewish man named Isaacs, and gives birth to Alex Randall’s son, named Denys. I have no idea what the TV show will do with her, except that I’m sure her son will still run into our characters again in America.
  6. Voyager/Book 3/What happens next?
    1. See the Season Three Speculation page for more info.
    2. When I finish each book’s re-read I may post a synopsis for each book, and a synopsis for each season of the show so far.
  7. Jamie and Bouton
    1. Best thing ever! I’m not even sure what this person wanted to find, but in the book, Jamie argues playfully with Bouton and Bouton is having none of it. What they put in the show was more brief, but still super cute.
  8. When does Rupert die in Dragonfly in Amber?
    1. Rupert dies during the battle of Falkirk. It’s Chapter 43, appropriately titled “Falkirk.”
  9. Does Rupert tell anyone Jamie killed Dougal?
    1. Only the Outlander writers know the answer to this one. In the book, it’s a random MacKenzie named Willie who sees Jamie kill Dougal. And no, he doesn’t tell. We meet him again in America much later. As I recall, I think he tried to blackmail Jamie at that point? I will update this once I finish my re-read. But I seriously doubt that Rupert wouldn’t tell. He was incredibly pissed off. Not sure how or if that will make things play out differently.
    2. RELATED:
      1. Why does Dougal dislike Jamie?
        1. Lots of reasons, and none of them are specifically articulated in the books, but we can make educated speculations. First, because Jamie is what Dougal is not–a canny leader. He doesn’t let his passions drive him the way Dougal does. Second, because he knows that Colum would choose to make Jamie the next chief of Clan MacKenzie (for those reasons–Jamie has the charisma and savvy of Colum, but he is also strong and can lead men to battle like Dougal). Third, because Jamie is the son of Ellen MacKenzie, and both Colum and Dougal feel that Ellen betrayed them when she eloped with Brian Fraser.
        2. But I also feel that I need to point out that Dougal also loves Jamie intensely. This is not a simple relationship of antagonism. Jamie is the son Dougal wanted but never had (and in the books, he actually fostered Jamie for a time). And when Dougal does father a child–Hamish–he is forced to allow the world to believe he is Colum’s. So Dougal feels very parental about Jamie. But that doesn’t negate everything listed in the first bullet point.
      2. Why did Outlander choose to keep Willie alive?
        1. I’m assuming this means Willie from the MacKenzie Rent party in the show, who got married and emigrated to America between seasons one and two. Technically, the Willie MacKenzie from the books lived, too. He ended up being transported to the colonies. This Willie is just already there. I’m not sure why- maybe the actor had other commitments?
  10. Jamie and Claire’s reunion in Voyager.
    1. Oh, for those of you who haven’t read the books yet, you’re in for a treat. I highly suggest you go get a copy and read it, but here’s the gist: Jamie has been working as a printer in Edinburgh, using the false name Alexander Malcolm (A. Malcolm). But he’s also smuggling alcohol and writing seditious pamphlets, because Jamie can’t ever just do one, safe thing. Claire shows up after 20 years at the print shop, and at first Jamie thinks she’s a ghost. Apparently he has seen her a few times over the years. But she’s real! And he immediately faints. 🙂
  11. Did Jamie kiss Lord John?
    1. Non-book readers won’t understand why this question is being asked, but the answer is YES. More than once (although never with the sort of passion John would like!).
  12. Tynchal
    1. This search term comes up often. I assume people don’t actually care about the Outlander tynchal, so here’s a brief definition: In the most basic sense, a tynchal is a hunt. But in the Highlands, it took on ceremonial value and became a rite-of-passage and a chance to prove physical prowess and cunning. The subjects of a tynchal were typically boar or stags.
    2. In Outlander, the tynchal is a boar hunt, and two people are gored. One of them dies, and the experience bonds Claire and Dougal MacKenzie.
  13. Catullus in Outlander
    1. Here’s a link to the translated poem by Richard Crashaw that DG references. It’s gorgeous. But if you want a literal translation, here’s the Wikipedia page with the Latin.
  14. Who will play Lord John Grey in Season Three of Outlander?
    1. The super-sexy David Berry! The link goes to his IMDB page. 🙂 I’m actually pleased with this choice, as he is a very pretty man. He’s a good bit taller than John in the books (who is described as short and slight, even for the time), but from what I can see of him in pictures he’s a very lean actor, not big and bulky like Sam Heughan. So it should still make for a good contrast.
  15. Outlander Avengers 213
    1. Yeah, I’m baffled, too. No idea why they went with this choice for their episode 213 title card. The explanations offered by Ron Moore and co. don’t entirely make sense.
  16. Why do they need gemstones to travel through the stones in Outlander?
    1. Well, you technically don’t. Claire went through once in the show and twice in the books without them. But they make the passage easier. It’s said by the characters that they help you “steer,” or find the right time on the other end. See my post on time travel for more info.
  17. Does Brianna time travel?
    1. Several times. And so does Roger. 🙂
    2. And their kids. ^_^
    3. Hey, this place is called Outlander Spoilers for a reason!
  18. What happens to Fergus in Outlander?
    1. I’m guessing this question is about what will happen after season two. If they follow the books, as a young man he loses a hand in an altercation with a British officer in order to save Jamie, who is hiding nearby. When Claire travels back to 1766, he is all grown up and in love with Marsali, Jamie’s step-daughter. (Yes, you read that right). He and Marsali eventually marry and have several children and Fergus becomes a printer in America.
    2. But in case you meant to ask about Fergus and BJR, yes, BJR raped him. In the books, it was slightly more transactional (not that a child can ever consent to sex, no matter if said child is being paid), but just as awful.
  19. Outlander time travel theories
    1. See my post!
  20. When did Lord John Grey marry Claire Randall?
    1. Well, she was very much Claire Fraser when they got married in Book 7. Also, if you haven’t read the books, you’re probably like, “Who is Lord John Grey?” and “Claire marries someone other than Jamie and Frank?”
    2. Yes, she does. She thinks Jamie has been lost at sea, and the British are about to arrest her for spying, so LJG marries her to keep her safe. And yes, the marriage is consummated. Which is kinda weird for both of them.
    3. And Jamie is super pissed about it when he shows up, and DG LEFT US ON A CLIFFHANGER FOR YEARS UNTIL MOBY OMG.
  21. Was Claire raped by the red coat deserter?
    1. Almost, but no.
  22. “Dragonfly in Amber” Stones Sex
    1. I know, I hated it, too. In the book, there was so much more time, and they had a lovely sex scene, and the initials, and everything was poignant and meaningful. Jamie does basically fuck her right before she runs for the stones, but I wish they would have just cut that for the show. Having him walk her to the stones worked much, much better as a goodbye than a last quickie.
  23. Ned Gowan
    1. He is the man. No more needs to be said on this subject.
    2. OK, but since you asked.
    3. He helps save Claire’s life at the witch trial.
    4. He advocates for the clans during the aftermath of Culloden and helps many people keep their property when the English wish to seize it.
    5. He represents Laoghaire in her bigamy suit against Jamie. Yep. Bigamy.
    6. He remains awesome, and friends with Claire, despite #5. (EDIT: So, when I’m in the WordPress editor, these indented items show up as numbers. But on the actual webpage, they show up as letters. Ugh. So #5 should be E.)
  24. How does Echo in the Bone end?
    1. With a cliffhanger, damn it! I’ll get to this at some point in my reread, but suffice to say that we were all slavering for Written in My Own Heart’s Blood to find out what was going to happen to Jamie and Lord John on the road.
  25. Claire steals some of Gillian’s notebooks in “Dragonfly in Amber” (the episode).
    1. Yes. That happens in the book, too, although in much more contrived and thief-like circumstances. Those books become the basis for many of the characters’ later theories about time travel. I assume we’ll see them again in Season Three.
  26. Did Ross (from Lallybroch) die at Culloden?
    1. In the books, all of the Lallybroch men got home safe. Roger found three men with similar names on the list of the dead at Culloden, but his trip to Edinburgh proved that those three weren’t the Lallybroch men (and none of them were named Ross). So they all made it home! Sadly, many of them didn’t stay there. Roger says two went to America, four died within a year, and one moved to a different parish. But Ross would have had good reason to stay, so I’m pretty sure he made it home to take care of Kincaid’s wife and bairns!

Ask additional questions in the comments below!