Episode 313 – Eye of the Storm

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You’ll notice as you read this blog that I don’t have a lot to say about what actually happens in the episode. I predicted most of it last week, and while I liked the execution of many of the details, when I compare this week’s episode to last week’s, it just comes up short. Most of what I talk about in this blog are the things I think were missing.

I really, really hope that next season is better balanced in terms of assigning material from the book to each episode. Because I felt like this one was just ticking the boxes that needed to be ticked to finish Voyager and wrap up the season. I didn’t feel engaged by much of the story, even the parts I liked (John and Jamie, Yi Tien Cho and Margaret, some of the interactions between Jamie and Claire).

And, honestly, if I hadn’t already read the books, I wouldn’t feel any particular need to move on to the next season. They’ve wrapped everything up with a nice bow and here we are in the new world. This could easily be a series finale rather than a season finale. But getting back to the episode…

The title card seems to be foreshadowing the storm and Claire being dragged off the ship with a broken leg, but it’s curious to me that they’re showing that. In the talkback at the end of the episode, they said they were trying to set it up the same was as the premiere, but in the premiere, we kept coming back to Jamie on the battlefield, and the rest of the story was told via flashback until things moved forward. This was a time jump—starting at the end and then jumping back in time, to then later catch up to the opening scene. So if they were going for parallel structure, they missed the mark.

I do like the bit with Fergus and Marsali. It’s fantastic that she’s asserting herself in their relationship, and Fergus isn’t beating his chest and telling her no. And he’s no less masculine or manly for allowing his wife to be his equal. It’s really lovely to see.

Damn, I love Lord John. And yeah, things happen pretty much exactly as I said last week. John is never going to let any harm come to Jamie as long as he has the power to stop it. And damn, does he know how to throw his weight around. My heart fluttered as Jamie walked away. David Berry is killing it. All of my other complaints aside, they did a great job of casting this season.

Geillis is super nuts, y’all. And it’s odd to me that Claire used Brianna as proof. Why not just tell Geillis about seeing her at the stones in 1968? Or talk about Greg Edgars? Claire couldn’t have known those things if she wasn’t there, so that should be proof enough that she traveled. I mean, yeah, it’s in the moment and all that, but Geillis is off-her-rocker crazy. Wouldn’t Claire’s instinct be to protect Brianna at all costs? It was her instinct in the book, as I recall—Geillis found the pictures in Jamie’s pocket. “Because it needed to happen for the story/conflict” is not a good reason.

But we’ll just have to go with it. And the rest of the plot pieces come together, as predicted, with Margaret and Yi Tien Cho. I hope they make it to Martinique, and that she’s not too scarred about what happened to her brother, asshole though he was.

UGH to the voice over! It was so intrusive into the scene and threw me right out of the story. It drained every last bit of tension away. We all get it. The pool is the portal. It was clear from the moment they entered. And everything else in the scene made it clear, too. Stating it just made me start thinking and stop feeling—the exact opposite of what you want the audience to do in a moment like this.

And wow, they did not need to keep coming back to the shot of Geillis with her head partially severed from her neck, and the blood spurting. Ugh. Gross.

I did like Claire’s shock, and Jamie pulling her and Young Ian close. That was nice.

But of course, they get back onto a ship. And my first thought is that we just very volubly stated that Jamie could be taken—if he were at sea. (Spoilers: nothing comes of that. Inexplicably.)

I’m very distracted by the soap on Jamie’s face in this love scene. I know, nitpicky details. But soap tastes disgusting, and would be worse in this era—even if it’s expensive soap. There’s no way some of that isn’t going into Claire’s (Caitriona’s) mouth. Ah, finally wiping it off.

As much as I’m all for love scenes with Jamie and Claire—and this one’s dialogue was taken straight from the book—I hate to say it, but this is gratuitous sex. I’ve written a number of blog posts on sex scenes and romance, and the rule about sex is the same as the rule for any scene. If the scene isn’t pushing the plot forward or doing some other story duty (character development, raising stakes, creating conflict, etc.), it should be cut. And that scene should have been cut, because nothing happens except sex.

Or, rather, the scene should have been rewritten so that it acted as a way for Claire and Jamie to reconnect after everything that has just happened. If they’d had Jamie work through Claire’s trauma after killing Geillis, bringing her back with touch and love, this scene could have been amazing. Instead, it feels jarring. Here we are, after everything that has happened, and we’re getting this tongue-in-cheek, teasing, everyone’s happy and hunky-dory love scene. What??

And what about Young Ian? He was raped by Geillis. At least in the book, there was fallout from that act. Gabaldon dealt with it. She didn’t forget about it, or think we’d forget about it. I’m not thrilled with how it all worked out in the book, but she didn’t shy away from it, either. I don’t understand why they didn’t just cut that entirely. They are basically treating it as though it wasn’t a rape at all—which it entirely, 100%, was. And so was what happened to Fergus last season, but they dropped the ball on that one, too. What is up with that?

And then we’re tossed right into a storm. But there’s no sense that any of their actions are driving things forward here. It’s just random.

Why not write it so that they went into the storm because Jamie wasn’t on deck to tell them to avoid it? What if, like in the book, the Porpoise was actually pursuing them and that forced them into the storm? We could have lost the sex scene and done that instead. I still don’t understand why they cut the pursuit from the show. It feels like a mistake, even if I didn’t know how it worked in the book. There was very heavy-handed foreshadowing in the scene with LJG that never went anywhere—Chekhov’s gun that didn’t go off.

Basically, this episode is the culmination of all of their bad choices earlier in the season—and now not having enough time on this end to tell the story we need. They’re having to truncate everything, and the episode ends up just being a string of scenes that don’t feel totally connected.

The literal eye of the storm was a pretty visual, but I’m not getting the metaphor. What is the storm, exactly? Geillis and her prophecies?

Speaking of which, how does she manage to share that news? Did she send letters to like-minded people living in this time, and the word passes down 200 years until Brianna and Roger are living at Lallybroch? Or does someone else make a separate prophecy at some point?

The beach interlude was also baffling. It made more sense in the book to have Claire wake up in the house, and for their hosts to come and talk to them there. And at the end of the scene, the people just stroll away, no questions asked.

There also isn’t the sense of claiming their own identity again that we had in the books, since they’ve been using the name Fraser for most of the season, and certainly since arriving on Jamaica. That was always the big, dramatic bit for me, that pulled me through to the next book. Jamie has had to hide who he is for 20 years, even after Claire returned. But now he is in the New World, with a new start—and that allows him to regain his identity for the first time since Culloden. It’s a huge deal…and we didn’t get that sense at all.

All-in-all, I’m very disappointed with this season. The standout moments are the Jamie portions of the first few episodes, the much more nuanced and careful presentation of Yi Tien Cho, the lovely acting by David Berry, Fergus and Marsali’s relationship, and episode 312. Other than that…wow.

All I can say is that there is no Frank in Drums of Autumn (I don’t even remember any flashbacks, although it has been a while since I read it), and so maybe we will actually get a more balanced season four. One can hope.

Do you agree with my assessment of the season? I know several of you have been liking it, and that’s great! I really want to like it more, I swear. And I’m still hoping for the best as they move forward. There’s the potential for some truly epic stuff in the next book. *fingers crossed*

As usual, I will post a speculation page at some point during the hiatus to consider how to break Drums of Autumn into 13 episodes. But I doubt I’ll get that done until early 2018, as I still have to finish Secret Magic, the fourth book in my Fay of Skye series.

Despite my moaning and grumbling, I really do enjoy watching this show and writing this blog, and I enjoy getting comments from readers. So thanks for chiming in each week, and I can’t wait to see you all again for season four!

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Episode 312 – The Bakra

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From the previously-on segment, it does seem like we’re going to see John this episode, and that’s a relief. And the cold open revealed Geillis, so I’m glad to be back on somewhat even footing with my expectations vs. reality for the show.

I am sad that they still had Geillis rape Young Ian. (Yes, it’s rape. He’s 14 and she’s in her 50s, so consent isn’t possible, even if you discount the fact that he’s her prisoner and she has all of the power, which also negates consent. And oh, yeah, he’s drugged, too. Rape.) This has always been a problematic section of the books for me, and I’d hoped they wouldn’t include it in the show, or would at least cut the rape of a minor. The scene was striking enough with her bathing in blood and revealing just how crazy she is—we didn’t need the rest. I’m glad to cut to the credits.

The title card is odd, only because this must have happened before the cold open. So it’s weird to get it afterward.

Is it just wishful thinking on Jamie’s part that the Porpoise hasn’t yet made it to Jamaica? I get his reasoning, but the Artemis didn’t exactly make good time—being waylaid by storm and a broken mast. Unless the Porpoise ran into similar misfortune, there’s every reason to believe they would have made it into port days if not over a week earlier. And if the Porpoise was carrying the new governor (and I’m going to be angry if it was, because I really, really wanted to see Claire and John on the ship!), then the fact that a ball is scheduled would indicate that it has already arrived. (EDIT: Having seen the whole episode, he’s already been there a month, so, I’m still mad about the missing scene, but in the grand scheme of things it’s not a huge deal.)

But I suppose Claire and Jamie don’t know that—and we, the audience, don’t know it either.

I’m liking some of the other streamlining they’re doing in this episode, though—particularly with Temeraire and having him assist them at the ball (and their reason for attending). I also appreciate getting more information about the Brahan Seer prophecies, and that Geillis gives a different provenance for the treasure on the Selkie’s isle and why she knew where it was/wanted it. That was always a problem for me in the books.

The encounter with Archibald was a bit odd. I felt like they were trying to imply that he knew who Jamie and Claire really were, but I’m not sure how he could. Geillis knew Jamie’s real name even back at Leoch, but she’s been gone from Scotland for a very long time. How would she know about him going by the name Malcolm?

Or maybe I’m just reading too much into it, and the moment is only meant to show dramatic irony—that we, the viewers, know where Archibald is staying and with whom, and Claire and Jamie don’t.

I’m also liking that they are pressing hard on Claire and Jamie’s dislike of slavery. Jamie is from this time, and understands the realities of the world in which they’re living (hence him buying Temeraire in the first place), but he abhors the idea of enslaving another person, and looks truly chagrined when Claire says it will take a hundred years in America.

But Claire, it hasn’t ended yet. It’s still happening, right now. And I will link my readers to this article that gives you some ideas of ways to fight back. There are lots more articles like that. Find a way that works for you, and do it. And that’s not even engaging with the huge problem of forced prison labor that happens every day in the US. Slavery isn’t over. We just call it by a different name now. But I’m getting into dark territory. Let’s get back to the episode.

The interlude with Yi Tien Cho was interesting. They’re walking an incredible tightrope between turning the character into a parody and acknowledging the reactions that upper-class women of the time would have had to seeing him. Gary Young’s acting is saving it so far, because he gives the role a great amount of dignity and gravitas that keeps the scene from careening into comic relief.

Oh, but his shared glance with Margaret is so lovely. OK, they pulled that one off, and I’m happy to dance wherever they are leading me with these two.

And then they followed it up with a moment that reminds me why I’m still watching this show after a season that has had quite a few disappointments. I both needed to fan myself and fell deeply in love over that drawn-out, longing look between Claire and Jamie. This is the first time since they’ve been reunited that I actually felt like they were in love. Like they’ve finally reconciled the people they are now with the ones they remember, and come out on the other side stronger together. This is what Outlander is all about.

The scene with John is absolutely pitch-perfect. Jamie so earnest, wanting to hear about Willie, John pleased to be able to report good news and also yearning, his feelings put on display when the sapphire is revealed, Claire feeling awkward and like a third wheel. Perfection. This episode is rapidly catapulting to my favorite of the season.

I think they’re setting up Margaret and Yi Tien Cho in the garden in place of the dead woman—so more like he is “ruining” Archibald’s sister than being accused of murder. Which is good, in one sense, but terrible in another, because these two are beautiful together.

And so are Claire and John. Oh, so much delicious tension. Both of them trying to feel out what Jamie means to the other—and both jealous of the relationship he has with the other. And yet they’re striking sparks off each other in ways that are going to play out so, so well in the future. Lovely, lovely, lovely is all I have to say about that!

OK, I do have one more thing to say. What the heck is this piece of jewelry around Claire’s neck? Or rather, what is that clasp on her pearls? I can’t stop looking at it. It looks like a sparkling slug. There have even been times when the play of light on it in the scene made it look like it was moving and glistening wetly. Ick. Now I’ll return to real commentary, promise.

Well, that was until Geillis actually brought it up in the show! But knowing it’s black coral actually makes sense to why it looks like a slug, so now I understand. But really, Claire. Haven’t you learned anything about trusting/being friends with Gillian Edgars/Geillis Duncan-Abernathy?

And then to have Claire give the stink eye to Jamie and John for chatting and drinking is just the best. Love, love, love everything happening in this episode.

I’m freaking out over here right now, y’all. Margaret’s prophecy is so much more than we have ever gotten about the Brahan Seer prophecies and the reason why Bree and her family were attacked at Lallybroch in the 80s and I’m DYING. I really, really, really want to know if this is canon for the books, because it will blow my mind if it is.

Officially best episode of this season, and not just because of that. It’s actually very well plotted with clear character motivations, even given the deus ex machina coincidence-machine, and the pieces are fitting together with cohesion and purpose. Y’all, I am officially excited about Outlander again. Sad it took them 12 episodes to get here, but at least we’ve arrived.

I like having a moment with Fergus and Marsali and having that turn into them warning Jamie about Captain Leonard’s arrival. I’m also very glad that nothing bad happened to Margaret or Yi Tien Cho—and I’m hoping that he helps her escape from Rose Hall in the next episode and they go live happily ever after.

Having Temeraire find the signs and go off to join the maroons was nice. I think that will play out in the next episode when they need the help of the escaped slaves to go to Abandawe.

Ending with Jamie being captured makes sense, but I can’t help but feel like this is now false conflict. The freaking governor of Jamaica is in love with Jamie. He isn’t going to let anything bad happen to him. But I can also see that Jamie is having those exact thoughts—and that’s why he’s confident to send Claire on to Rose Hall to find Young Ian.

So in general, this episode kicked ass, and I am very, very happy about that. There are still threads dangling for next week (like Jamie handing Claire the pictures, so that Geillis can find out about Brianna), but this felt more like a two-part episode than anything else, so while we’re definitely hanging in the middle, once the next episode airs I’ll be able to watch them back-to-back and that feeling will go away.

One thing that I miss in this episode is the particular piece of dialogue between Claire and John when he talks about being born the wrong person for someone. It doesn’t fit into the episode, so I understand why they cut it, but I miss it very much. It’s my favorite quote from the books, and I think it perfectly encapsulates the odd triangle between John, Jamie, and Claire. We certainly got a sense of that in the acting, but I liked having him actually say it in the books. Maybe they’ll fit it in later in the series.

I just watched Lani’s vlog over at Sex and Whisky, and she and I are on exactly the same page, as usual. The coincidences are so far out there, and yet, the show is embracing them with flair. When the characters are strong and the story is well-told, I’m willing to go with it. But if you’re looking for another voice that’s saying everything I am, go watch her videos for this season. It was fun watching her this week, since she’s so happy and that’s exactly how I’m feeling right now.

What did you think of this episode? Are you excited about Outlander again like I am? Or if you never stopped being excited, does this episode also top your list for this season? Let me know in the comments!

Episode 311 – Uncharted

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My Thanksgiving holiday weekend was very odd. I started feeling sick on Monday, and I host the dinner at my house, so by the time Wednesday rolled around and I was still prostrate on the couch, I decided to reschedule our family dinner. Due to work schedules, today was the lucky day that everyone could meet up and do Thanksgiving, take two. Since there were many preparations that needed to be made ahead of time, I was busy cooking and cleaning all day yesterday and I was too tired to stay up late and watch the episode at midnight. So this blog is very late! But it’s still Sunday where I am, so that’s something.

I love the title card, mostly because I adore sea turtles. They are so beautiful. The treatment of the Skye Boat Song under the shot of the turtle was also fun. It is a little sad to know the fate of the turtle, though.

Did it really take until morning for Claire to drift to this island? Something must have gone terribly wrong, or else it was much farther away than it looked.

Also, I still fail to see how this helps Jamie at all. Unless he somehow finds her on this island (which obviously is going to happen, but only by coincidence), the reasonable assumption is that he’s going to go to Jamaica and get caught in the trap there, whether or not Claire is actually in the trap. And considering how fast they were pushing the Porpoise to travel, I can’t see how Claire imagines that she’s going to get there first. It would make more sense for her to stay with the British and try to warn Jamie when the time comes (or get away from them in Jamaica).

To be fair, this is a logic problem from the book, and not the fault of the TV writers. But it goes to show that they are still, for the most part, keeping some of the most problematic and difficult sections of the books when they should be adapting instead, and then adapting in places that make no sense and only end up making things worse.

It’s not like I’m giving up on the show or anything, because when they get it right it is still wonderful. But when they get it wrong, it is starting to feel expected, and that’s not good.

And then, after some silent shaking-sand-out-of-clothes shots, we get a voice over. And I’m scared, because I think Claire is going to be alone for at least a while in this episode, and so she’s going to be talking to us a lot. And maybe they’ll be good voice overs, but I just got finished watching Cast Away with Tom Hanks and that movie is a tour de force for long periods of screen time with no dialogue. (Until Wilson, of course, but then you have to infer the other side of the conversation, and that still shows a huge amount of respect and trust in the audience that we will get it without needing to have things spelled out for us).

I mean, really. All we needed to have is Claire staggering toward the bromeliads and then slurping up the water and desperately looking for more to know that she’s dangerously dehydrated. And we can see that she’s moving inland, and the town thing isn’t really important. Obviously, she wants to find signs of civilization.

Um, Claire…why did you put your whole bum roll on the fire? You’re going to need that for the next time you want to start a fire. Also, I’m surprised she wasn’t covered with various tropical insect bites already, long before the ants.

OK, they’re actually being much more judicious with the voice over than I expected. But I still feel like they didn’t need any of it at all. (This statement goes for all of it throughout the episode, not just before her rescue).

Why did they subtitle the…Spanish? Portuguese? (I can’t remember from the book, I don’t speak either one, and I’m too tired to go look). Claire obviously doesn’t speak it. And they were so good about not subtitling the Gaelic in previous seasons that I’m not used to subtitles when our PoV character doesn’t know the other language.

Haha. Having just mentioned Cast Away, I am laughing at Coco’s resemblance to Wilson. Although I think Father Fogden is far madder than Chuck in Cast Away ever got.

I suppose the subtitling does let us know some things that Claire doesn’t know (and we’ve broken from her PoV this season, so one can argue that we’re getting an omniscient PoV at the moment). But then we get more voice over right after the argument at the dinner table, and it just feels weird to have the two juxtaposed. First, we’re far out of her PoV to get the subtitles, and then we’re deep in her PoV getting voice over. There’s some cognitive whiplash that happens in that scene.

The clean clothes voice over is just as unnecessary. We can clearly see and infer everything that she tells us, including why she might choose to talk to the coconut. I don’t think her pretend conversation would have worked, but fortunately for Claire deus ex machina saves her from herself.

Normally I dislike flashbacks, too, but the one to Margaret Campbell is actually good, because I’d forgotten that she spoke of Abandawe to Claire. And Claire’s going to be going there soon, so it’s good to be reminded of it now, a few episodes before the end of the season. And I like that they are being somewhat subtle about it—giving us just enough information to put together what we know of the stones in Scotland with whatever sort of place Abandawe is, but not enough to have a clear picture of what’s ahead.

The next few scenes are just layers of deus ex machina, but I’ll try to get over that. And wow, they just put a lampshade on it when they had the two new Scotsmen point out that Claire shows up in the oddest places. It’s like the writers are tongue-in-cheek asking us to just go with it. And I don’t like that at all—that works in screwball comedies that break the fourth wall, but not in Outlander.

Having Yi Tien Cho apologize for Arabella is an odd choice, and I can’t decide if I like it or not. I’m glad, on the one hand, that he is shown as adaptable and respectful—even to a mad priest. But on the other hand, all he did was catch a goat that, to him, seemed wild. Would they have made any crew member apologize? I’m not sure. Having Fogden share the pipe helps, though.

I love Marsali and Claire talking about sex and contraception, and I’m excited to see the beginnings of respect and affection that are shown in this scene—even if I have to forget that they were still not on good terms when Claire left the Artemis a few episodes ago. Maybe Marsali is just more disposed to be happy and accepting since she’s getting her way and marrying Fergus.

The wedding scene was good for a few chuckles, but I remember it being both funnier and more touching in the book. When Jamie claims Fergus as his son officially, it is an acknowledgment of everything between them for the past twenty-plus years, and almost made me cry when I read it. But the show rushed through—mostly because Fergus and Marsali are in such a rush. I’ve felt that most of the big emotional moments this season have either been rushed in the moment or not properly built up over the course of an episode/the season. With only two episodes left, I’m sad to say that this is easily the weakest season of Outlander so far.

I’ve said it before, but they could have saved themselves if they’d only done three episodes before reuniting Jamie and Claire. They didn’t have enough material to stretch to six episodes back then, and now they’re having to leave huge swathes of the story on the writer’s room floor. It makes no sense why they did what they did. I’m imagining some sort of mandate from Ron Moore that said the reunion has to happen midway through the season, regardless of what that does to the story. Sigh.

I’m happy to have Yi Tien Cho take over the Murphy/Stern role in the turtle soup incident, though. It seems fairly clear that they have Yi Tien Cho on a very different path in the show than in the books, and that is 100% for the best. I’m imagining him going with them into Abandawe, and how meaningful that will be.

What isn’t for the best is that I’m pretty sure there’s no John Grey in the rest of the season. If they were going to have him in the next two episodes, I think he would have been in the preview shots. And everything with Young Ian looks different…to the point that I’m wondering if we’re actually going to see Mrs. Abernathy. And yet…we had the bones back in Boston. How is that going to work out? I suppose we’ll have to wait and see.

What did you think of “Uncharted?” Are you as disappointed, in general, with the season as I am? Or do you see something I’m missing? Obviously the good things are still there—the performances are excellent, and I fall a little more in love with Cesar Domboy every time he’s on screen (but I have a weakness for lanky men with dark hair and blue eyes). But the negative aspects somehow seem to have snowballed this season. Do you agree? Let me know in the comments.

Episode 310 – Heaven and Earth

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I am actually doing this episode’s blog in advance! I am having several Thanksgivings this year, and one of them is tomorrow (well, later today), so I stayed up late and am watching at midnight. I’ll schedule the blog to go up around 10 am.

Whoa, another cold open. Although I suppose it makes sense to get the last few minutes of the last episode from Jamie’s perspective before we officially start this one.

Still loving the new intro, especially the melding of the folkdances from the women around the stones to the African dances around the bonfire.

Oh, there they go with the title card, opening the cask of crème de menthe.

UGH VOICE OVER. We get it. A shot of her looking wistfully out to sea would do as much—if not more—than the terrible voice over.

Elias is super cute, and I hope they don’t kill him off like in the book. I know that deaths make for drama and we have to kill our darlings, but I like him. The actor is doing a great job of capturing that odd reality of the British navy in the era, when junior officers were almost always the younger sons of gentlemen or family of other officers, and could go to sea at a very young age. And yet they were meant to be in charge of much older men, many of whom had been pressed into service and had absolutely no desire to be there.

Wow, I was super right about how awful this scene with Jamie and Fergus would be. It was bad enough disparage Fergus’s feelings, but then to bribe him with his blessing is just…icky. I know Jamie is frantic, but wow. I want to say #notmyjamie, but we’ll see how the rest of the episode goes.

Overbearingly evil men are overbearing and evil. Ugh to the cook being so moustache-twirlingly bad.

Elias saves the scene, though, as he is saving the episode for me so far.

The Johansen scene was a little weird—especially since alcohol poisoning can be very serious, including making you go blind or die. It felt like the only reason it was there was for Claire to see the Portuguese flag, which in turn sends her to the captain’s cabin where she can read the log entry about Jamie. I don’t like it when the plot elements are so painfully obvious and not actually motivated by character action.

Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ. This show already has a rape problem, which is to say that it relies on rape too heavily as a source of conflict. But to feed into the lie in our culture that women routinely lie about rape to get their way, or get out of trouble, or just to be bitches, makes me want to scream. Especially right now, when we are finally, finally listening to and believing women when they come forward to talk about being assaulted. This is such a step in the wrong direction. Do better, Outlander writers. Do better.

The Fergus and Marsali scene was nice. I like how they’re both strong-willed and stubborn, but accept each other with their strengths and weaknesses. It was also very well-acted. I was convinced that Fergus was on the edge of giving in, and then finally brought himself back to reality. Well done.

I dislike Claire using Elias to get to Tompkins, but just like Jamie, she’s willing to cross some ethical lines to keep the person she loves safe. But unlike Jamie, Claire thinks she’ll be able to keep this particular situation under control and that it won’t end up hurting anyone who doesn’t deserve it. I like that she’s actively seeking Tompkins, though. I always hated that he just randomly ended up needing surgery in the book. I loathe deus ex machina coincidences.

And again with the rape threats, against Marsali this time, and with their “friendly” crew. What the hell? Although I imagine that’s going to mean that Fergus refuses to set Jamie free and risk Marsali being hurt.

Claire is certainly a little vindictive against Tompkins, but he did set the print shop on fire and try to kill Young Ian, so I can’t be that mad about it. And putting him into the brig with the typhoid carrier is a nice touch.

I love that Fergus stands up to Jamie, and throws his words back at him. Jamie isn’t seeing clearly because he’s blinded by his worry for Claire, but Fergus has the pulse of the ship and he knows he’s doing what is best for all of them.

Oh, crap. They are going to go there. Poor Elias. I wish I didn’t know that at the beginning. And damn you, Bear McCreary, because you’re ripping my heart out right now.

I like that Claire makes an attempt at escape and fails, and Captain Leonard tells her the truth about everything. Nicer to have things out in the open, even if Leonard is being too stuffy and honor-bound about it.

EDITED TO ADD: I forgot to talk about Jamie’s return to the crew and giving his blessing to Fergus and Marsali. Basically, I kinda hate this entire plotline. Jamie would never do the things they had him do in this episode. He’s not an idiot. He has walked tightropes of politics and danger before (remember giving the oath at Leoch? Not to mention pretending to be Prince Charlie’s friend while secretly working behind his back to thwart his ability to start another Rising). I know he’s upset about Claire, but does that take away everything that makes him who he is? They are writing him as though he was like Dougal, slave to his emotions, instead of like Colum, canny and intelligent. Jamie would make a plan to save Claire. He wouldn’t go off half-cocked and he would never, ever hold something so important as his blessing in marriage over Fergus’s head to do something that he knows could literally get Fergus killed. No way, and no how. #NOTMYJAMIE And then they somehow just bring him out at the end and he’s back to normal. WTF?

(back to the original blog)

Oh, sadface. We haven’t had the scene with John and Claire on deck and she’s about to jump ship (literally). Maybe they’ll move the conversation to later, once they’re actually on the island. Because I really adore that particular exchange. Or maybe they couldn’t justify it because John has had flashback-style memories of Claire and they didn’t think we would believe that he wouldn’t remember her (although her not recognizing him isn’t an issue since he was only 16 before Prestonpans). And it doesn’t work as well after he knows who she is and she knows what John means to Jamie.

Or maybe they’ve removed him from the Porpoise completely, and it will just be a surprise to find him already installed as the governor in Jamaica. I can’t imagine that he won’t appear at all in the rest of the season—although the revelation about Willie has already happened. But so much of Claire and John’s friendship is established in that scene where they talk while Jamie is being questioned about murder. I doubt there will be a murder since there wasn’t a Fiend in Edinburgh, but I still want them to have that conversation.

The preview for next week doesn’t look very exciting in terms of changes, except that it looks like Jamie will still be with the crew when the Artemis beaches. And I didn’t see anyone who might be Lawrence Stern, so we may just have Father Fogden. But I really hope we get a wedding with attendant sheep!

Well, now the writers have clearly stated (in the talkback) that they are planting rabbits throughout the season to be references to Bree. It made no sense whatsoever on the battlefield at Culloden, but I guess I see what they were trying to do. Matthew B. Roberts suggested that it will have a payoff at the end—I’m guessing that will somehow tie into the Bakra episode and Margaret summoning the vision of Brianna.

This episode wasn’t terrible, but aside from the Elias and Fergus storylines, I wasn’t very impressed, either. The stuff with Tompkins just feels like a distraction. How did they know about the dead man in the crème de menthe? It obviously wasn’t an accident that they opened that cask. And why was Tompkins pressed? He made it sound like Sir Percival did it on purpose, but why would he do that except to cover up something? And yet, the warrant was sworn for Jamie anyway. It doesn’t really make sense.

What did you think of the episode? Did you miss Lord John as much as I did? They’re cutting storylines left and right. Are any of your favorite pieces from the book missing? Or did they keep in something you love? Let me know in the comments!

(PS–if you aren’t watching Lani Diane Rich’s Outlander vlog Sex and Whisky, you are missing out! I almost always agree with her opinions and comments.)

Episode 308 – First Wife

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This week I have been—thank goodness!—busy writing. I went to a write-in for NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) with a friend this weekend and we used our extra hour writing until 3:30 this morning. So I crashed for most of the day today and I am just now watching the episode for the first time at about the time that it is airing live.

The title card looks like it should be a spread from the Outlander Kitchen cookbook by Theresa Carle-Sanders (which you should totally get if you like to cook). I’m not sure yet what it’s meant to represent—maybe wifely duties at this point in history? (After watching the episode, I still don’t entirely get it).

UGH to the voice-over again. Haven’t they heard enough criticisms of it yet to stop using it? It’s such a crutch, and not an excuse for bad writing.

The acting in the first scene is amazing, though! Love Sam doing the Jamie finger-tic, and the tension between Jenny and Claire. Caitriona is playing Claire as optimistic and longing for the camaraderie and home that she lost so long ago, and that need for family is overriding her awareness of just how long it has been and what those twenty years have been like in the Highlands after Culloden. But Jenny can’t forget, and Laura Donnelly plays that beautifully.

OK, I don’t get it. Jamie thrashed Claire in season one because he “had to” but he comes up with a creative alternate punishment for Young Ian now? Why couldn’t they write their way around Jamie beating his wife in season one, too?? And yes, I’m sure there’s an argument to be made that he has matured and grown in twenty years, but that’s ridiculous when the only reason for keeping the first scene was because it was in the book. If that argument worked then, why not now? This scene was written to be a punishment for both Jamie and Young Ian—so that they would both feel the pain and the shame of what they’d done. I don’t hold with corporal punishment for children, but at least the book had nuance and shades of meaning to it. This is just smelly manual labor and, while unpleasant for Young Ian, has no consequences whatsoever for Jamie.

There’s so much going unsaid in this episode, as everyone carefully avoids talking about Laoghaire. And then there’s Jenny who sees too clearly and can’t accept the lies that protect Claire’s secrets.

I’m a little confused about the flashback, and why it’s here. I mean, it’s introducing the idea of the gems and coins that will need to be retrieved to pay Laoghaire off later, and it gives Claire more insight into Jamie’s past, but it feels intrusive—the brushstrokes of the painting.

Lots of people have talked about Claire and birds, and I like that she talks about hearing Jamie’s voice in birdsong, and that they finally included the story of the plovers from Outlander.

Oh, wee Joanie. One nice thing about breaking Claire’s PoV is getting to have sweet moments like that, and seeing Jamie in a different guise than laird, husband, warrior. Jamie as father (and later grandfather) is always nice to see.

The fight was pulled directly from the book, and Sam and Caitriona played it very well. I particularly liked Jenny and Claire afterward, and Ian confronting Jenny for her choices.

The writers seem to be forgetting just how vicious and terrible Laoghaire was in season one, compared to the books. I truly can’t see any circumstances under which Jamie would have married her, given what he knew in the show and what he witnessed at the trial. The post-surgery scene tries to address it, but falls far, far short of the mark. The arguments from the book only make sense when he didn’t know what Laoghaire did. I understand loneliness, and wanting to be a father, but that does not explain why he would pick Laoghaire, not even for the sake of Marsali and Joan. Not after season one, and not even after the “forgiveness” episode. It’s one thing to forgive and make their peace with her. It’s another thing to marry the woman who tried her damnedest to have Claire killed.

(Also, it’s hard to suspend my disbelief about the girls and Young Ian looking exactly the same over two years previous in the Hogmanay flashback—the sort of thing that I would probably buy into if I weren’t reeling with incredulity already).

I did laugh over Sam playing up Jamie’s fear of the needle. But it doesn’t really save the episode for me. I’m terribly bothered by Jamie’s choices in ways I wasn’t in the book.

Ned Gowan does nearly save things. Damn, I love that man. I would watch him just reading law books aloud. And I like Jenny’s concession, and softening, that will turn to many years of anger and pain when they lose Young Ian, first to the pirates, and later to the Mohawk.

I feel so little when Jamie says being a printer is naught compared to being Claire’s husband. That really should matter more, but it has so little weight when we don’t understand, in the show, just how important a part of Jamie’s identity that is. I want to feel a thrill when he asks her if she’ll risk the man his is now for the sake of the one she knew, but I just…don’t.

Am I overreacting? Does anyone else feel the same way I do? That marrying Laoghaire really was an unforgivable act, under the conditions created in the show? Or are we supposed to pretend that didn’t happen? Are the writers attempting to retcon the witch trial?

I’m not going to stop watching the show over this, because it’s pretty much done now and I love Marsali and Joan, so I’m glad they weren’t written out and I’m also glad that Claire comes to be more of a mother to Marsali than Laoghaire ever was. But much like “The Search” in season one, I will probably never watch this episode again, and will do my best to forget about it, despite some very good performances by the actors.

Sigh. And I still don’t see how they’re going to shove all of the rest of the content from Voyager into the remaining five episodes. But I will admit I am very much looking forward to seeing Claire on the Porpoise meeting John.

And can anyone explain to me why they don’t use a boat to go out to Selkie Island? I hear what Jamie is saying about the current, but just start farther up the coast and drift down, rowing against it just enough to steer where you want to go, and then row hard to get back to shore. Obviously it didn’t stop the men in the longboat from the ship. And given Jamie’s profession, he definitely knows people who have boats. Why not write to Jared and have one of his ships pick up the coins? We haven’t introduced Michael yet in the show, but he could have easily picked them up. So many plot holes! But I’ll let them pass.

The post-episode talk-back makes everything worse for me, Laoghaire-wise. Ron Moore talks about how he wanted to give Laoghaire more stuff in season one to make her more sympathetic and show why Jamie would eventually want to marry her—but that is the exact opposite of what they did by making her role in the witch trial more prominent. I am glad for Matt B. Roberts pushing on Jamie wanting more to be a father than to be married to Laoghaire. That’s the one true note in this episode, and the one thing I can believe about Jamie’s choices.

I promise I won’t harp on this forever. I’ll put it behind me so that I can enjoy future episodes. But I needed to rant and moan a bit first.

What did you think about “First Wife?” Do you buy what the writers are selling? And, by the way, I totally respect you if you do. The children angle is going to be my headcanon from now on, basically telling myself that Jamie only took Laoghaire because she came attached to Marsali and Joan, and that he never wanted her at all. If you are on board with him forgiving her and trying to make a true marriage, I can accept that—I’m certainly not going to tell you that your opinion is wrong! It just happens to be one I don’t share. But let me know what you think in the comments! I’m always interested in hearing other people’s reactions.

Episode 307 – Crème de Menthe

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Here we are on the other side of a ridiculous cliffhanger, with the threat of rape still hanging in the air like a noxious, completely avoidable fog. (Although I did like the use of the fire engine for the title card, foreshadowing the print shop fire…but I’m not sure what that has to do with crème de menthe??)

I am pleased that Claire didn’t actually kill the man outright, but the complication that they create with her immediately reversing course and trying to heal him seems absurd. I can see Claire having qualms about letting him die, and needing to wrap her conscience around it, but actively working to save him when she knows what’s at stake? I don’t know–it doesn’t really feel like Claire. Yes, she has done some very ill-advised things because of her 20th-century sensibilities. But this? I’m having some trouble with it.

ARGH ARCHIE CAMPBELL. I was so hoping we would be excising (haha) that storyline.

Young Ian, be still my heart! I love watching him show his competence so early in the show while bargaining with the tavern owner. These are the seeds of the strong man he will grow up to be, and I’m delighted to witness them.

This episode is pushing the bounds of credulity for me with Claire’s insistence on healing the exciseman. Yes, she is a healer. Yes, she swore an oath when she became a surgeon. But she has killed before when necessary, and made her peace with that. She is, at heart, a pragmatic woman. The episode just barely manages to save itself (for me, anyway)  with the scene after the exciseman died. Barely. But I can see this as being part of Claire readjusting to the realities of the 18th century, and needing some time to accept that she isn’t in Boston with her surgery anymore.

But, let me just point this out: the exciseman dies anyway and gets crated into a barrel, making everything moot, and there are no repercussions for Claire’s actions either way. Which is basically the definition of false conflict. Sigh.

On the other hand, I love, love, love Fergus and Young Ian at the tavern. Their friendship—and the thought of the future they both want to create—is beautiful. Fergus’s teasing really makes them feel like brothers. I’m trying to figure out how old Young Ian is here—I seem to remember him only being fourteen. OK, I just checked. It’s 1766, and he was born in 1752, so that’s right. That seems awfully young to me, but maybe I just can’t remember well enough being that age. I’m sure I felt I was old enough for everything Young Ian wants to do, and I wasn’t living in a period of history that didn’t have the same concept of childhood as we do. Although I think voting age in Scotland is sixteen now, which isn’t that much older than fourteen, and would be considered adulthood for most purposes. But I still had a moment of “he’s just a baby!” especially given the following scenes.

They’re going in a different direction with the Campbells, and I have to say I approve. Archie is definitely taking advantage of his sister, but I’m glad they’re changing him from the ultra-religious Fiend. We can do without that storyline entirely (and, I hope, the attendant problems with Yi Tien Cho), and this way we still have Margaret in the West Indies during the slave uprising without all of the mess of the other storyline.

Speaking of Yi Tien Cho, I’m glad that Claire calls him by his actual name. And that, after that first somewhat problematic scene, they aren’t using him for comic effect or pushing hard on him being Chinese. In this episode he was just a member of Jamie’s crew–if a more trusted one than most–and that was refreshing to see.

Ian’s visit highlights just how much Jamie is lying to everyone. In the first half of the scene, he lies to Ian about his son. In the second half, he admits to lying (by omission) to Claire about his second wife (not that anyone has said those words yet—but in each episode since Claire returned someone has remarked on the thing that Jamie isn’t telling Claire). Claire shines a light on that when they talk upstairs afterward.

Young Ian truly does take after his uncle (in more ways than one…no, it’s not so much like horses, or whores, Ian). He’s fearless, and thinks of the lass first, getting her out of danger. Yes, things rather blow up around him (and unfortunately the man got away with a stack of pamphlets), but he didn’t back down. His storyline is the only real plot that we get in this episode, but it works very well.

Claire and Jamie’s fight seems well-motivated, unlike the earlier arguments over the exciseman. Some of Jamie’s anger, however, is out of proportion to the topic. I think his guilt about Laoghaire is fueling the bitterness and accusations. Not that he says anything he doesn’t mean, but he’s a bit harsher about it than he might otherwise have been.

The print shop fire scene is great, and handles a lot of the plot threads from the book in a more convincing way than the betrayal during the smuggling shipment. But with that said, I am sorely disappointed that Jamie doesn’t save his printing press, even though I’m sure that part would have been impossible to film. The loss of Bonnie is going to cause rather large changes to future events—to lots of future events. The press was a huge part of Jamie’s life—to the point he even named it. So losing that here, while expediting this story and picking up the pace of this particular episode, means losing not only a giant chunk of future storylines, but a whole aspect of Jamie’s life and personality from the books.

This sort of thing is bound to happen in adaptations, but I do mourn the loss. Jamie as writer and printer is one of my favorite incarnations of Jamie. I am glad he saved the miniature of Willie, though.

Ah, now Fergus has actually said the words “other wife.” I’m very surprised that they did that, but I suppose they know that a good percentage of show watchers have already read the books and know what’s coming. And now there’s dramatic irony, since all of the viewers know something Claire doesn’t.

The final shot of Jamie watching the press burn is heart-wrenching, but there’s a lot of other stuff going on, too, and since the show hasn’t articulated his love for the press well, it could be just him mourning one way of life that is now gone, or worrying about what is going to happen next with Claire, Young Ian, and Laoghaire.

Speaking of what happens next–why wasn’t Ian there? If he’s out looking for Young Ian, you’d think a fire would bring him running. I suppose we’ll see him early in the next episode, or Jamie will mention him having already left for Lallybroch, or somesuch.

The “next time on Outlander” segment is spoilerific. They don’t actually use any clips of anyone saying Laoghaire’s name, so at this point all non-reading audiences know is that Jamie married again, but it seems clear enough that this is going to cause major friction and perhaps splintering between Jamie and Claire. I do wonder if Jamie will end up being shot—they show Claire and Jamie on the cliffs (I assume while Young Ian swims out to get kidnapped), but by that point in the book they had basically reconciled. So there are some questions going into next week.

Sorry for the lack of pictures again, and for the very late blog this week. My son has been sick and I had to wait until bedtime to watch the episode and start the blog. Rather than wait another half hour while I do screengrabs and edit them in Photoshop, I’m just going to go ahead and post. But I do intend to try and find an hour this week to add pics to both this blog and the one from last week!

What did you think of this episode? Do you agree with me that it was a lot of false conflict and created problems? What do you think of Jamie’s stance on lies? Let me know in the comments!

Episode 306 – A. Malcolm

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Huzzah for the return of Outlander! (I know it’s only been an extra week, but I’m still glad it’s back!) And huzzah for an extra-long episode!

It was weird to not have the theme song and title card before the show started, but I understand why. This is one of our first real cold opens ever in Outlander. And I see how they are trying to position Jamie’s business and hint at his relationship with Madam Jeanne and some of the Ardsmuir men, as well as his—what, indentured servant? I didn’t get the impression Geordie was anything but a coworker in the book. But it makes sense to have all of that before the scene where we left off in the last episode. It doesn’t give away everything about what he’s up to know, but it gives us a better grounding in his life since he left Helwater—the smuggling wasn’t stated outright, but it’s clear that he has nefarious business with the two men sleeping in his shop, and we know he’s printing seditious pamphlets. They were a little heavy-handed with Madam Jeanne, especially since there’s a much bigger fish swimming around back in the Highlands, but I’ll accept it.

Also, the title card is fantastic! Love that they put the writer credits onto the sheets.

Uh-oh. Jamie’s reaction and his “aye, we are” to the married line is such a giveaway if you know about Laoghaire. But his asking for permission to kiss her is so perfect and wonderfully Jamie. And yes, I cried. When this show gets it right, it is devastatingly right. “There’s the two of us now.”

Well, if Geordie can quit, then he’s not indentured. He must just have a tendency to overstate things.

The scene with the pictures of Brianna is tearing my heart out. I can’t imagine missing twenty years of my kids’ lives. And Jamie’s casual acceptance of Claire’s calling as a surgeon is also beautiful. She had to fight so hard for that in the 1950s and 60s and he just states it as absolute truth.

I’m happy that Jamie tells Claire about Willie right away, but his withholding information about Laoghaire is irksome. I suppose talking about a child is different than a wife—more forgivable, especially since he didn’t love or marry Geneva Dunsany—but

The reunion with Fergus is also nice—Cesar Domboy is so tall! And it sets a pattern for everyone in Jamie’s life automatically hiding his secret from Claire. Which, I suppose, makes sense, since she’s been gone for twenty years and their loyalties are very much with him. The mention of Ned Gowan makes me so happy! I can’t wait to see him again.

The introduction of Willoughby, while not quite as terrible as in the book, is still problematic. I hope they don’t push hard on the really awful bits, but I don’t have much confidence about that. The next episode should set the tone for his character better.

I’m not sure how I feel about the bribe and threats in the tavern. But this section of the book was entirely in Claire’s PoV and the show has broken that conceit for good, so we’re getting to see all sorts of things that she wasn’t privy to, and that does help with timing and pacing (and establishing conflict) for the show.

The rest of the reunion in the brothel is pretty much straight from the book, with some omissions for time. But UGH to the voice over. Was that really necessary? We get it, TV show. We can see what’s happening. A little montage of eating and music would have been plenty.

I wondered why they designed Claire’s dress to have the cravat and shirt, but the parallel undressing is nice because of it. WOW—they really managed to get Caitriona Balfe’s hair curly this season. It was never that curly in previous seasons, and I remember in interviews she said it refused to take a perm or curl. Honestly, this looks like a wig. Or at least like they used about a thousand hair products on it. I shouldn’t be distracted by that, but I am.

And now we have callbacks to “The Wedding” from season one. Except that Claire and Jamie so different now, and yet so much the same. The performances by Sam and Caitriona here are superb. And I’m glad they kept the awkwardness and the humor from the book, as well as the passion and the tenderness.

I’m really appreciating how well this episode is unfolding, allowing them the peace to rediscover each other. Jamie doesn’t talk as much about his love of his printing press and the power of words as he does in the book (one of my favorite lines from Voyager is about how the English took his weapons away, and speaking out via his writing gave them back). But although he’s giving her part of his truth, he’s still keeping much of it to himself.

I would have thought the scar from Culloden would have been much uglier, especially given what they had to do to keep it from killing him with blood poisoning. I know that type of scar is difficult to do with prosthetics, but they could have done better than that! It looks like a clean scalpel cut with the kind of stitches that dissolve from the inside.

The questions of twenty years apart are answered by Jamie’s “I never loved anyone but you.” And neither did Claire. But the niggling details of those twenty years still have the power to hurt them both.

I miss Ian barging in, though. (Old Ian, not Young Ian). Young Ian is not at all how I pictured him in the book, but they did find an actor who looks like Steven Cree, especially with the hair tied back. And the scene with the “hoors” is fantastic. I love how Claire just plays along, adding her wisdom and getting bedroom tips. Madame Jeanne is, again, heavy-handed, but I suppose they’re playing her as being in love with Jamie. Because who in the show isn’t?

UGH to rape threats. Aren’t we done with that? And cliffhangers, too. They couldn’t have used the setup from the book, where Claire encounters the man downstairs? I am so tired of sexual violence as the go-to for conflict, especially after an episode where they did such a great job of letting the story develop at a leisurely, intimate pace. I didn’t even have as much to say as usual, despite this being an extended episode, because it drew me in so well and the performances were so fantastic. So to have this ending is like a punch in the gut—and not in a good way. I like when things get shaken up before the next episode. But there were so many better ways to have ended this than with a cut to black over Claire being attacked.

My family is off to our local renaissance festival today, so I don’t have time for my usual screenshots, but I’ll try to come back and insert some later this week. What did you think of the print shop reunion? Did it live up to your expectations? Do you also hate the way it ended? Let me know in the comments!

Episode 305 – Freedom and Whisky

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Here we are, with episode five of season three! There will be no new episode next week, which is actually good timing for me since I’ll be in a wedding and have a birthday party to go to. I was worried about how I would fit watching the episode a few times and writing this blog into my schedule, but now I don’t need to! (Note that IMDB has the break happening on the 22nd, but other sources have it as the 15th).

On with the episode–“Freedom and Whisky.”

Oh, wow. That handmade Christmas ornament from 1948 in the title card looks *exactly* like an ornament I made for my parents when I was in kindergarten. Except I mixed the red and green paint and the whole thing turned out brown. Not sure how this will be symbolic yet (especially since it’s from 1948), but I guess we’ll see as the episode progresses. (Note—it ends up being a touchpoint for Brianna in her grief after losing Frank).

I didn’t really need to see all of that blood in the surgery scene, but I’ll live, because it shows us Claire being an amazing surgeon, not only competent but extraordinary at her calling. I’m a little sad that this rules out her having been moved to head of surgery in the wake of the assisted-suicide event (Claire recounts that to Jamie later in the books), because I thought it was beautiful that Claire was willing to treat the patient and not the disease. But this works, too.

I LOVE LOVE LOVE that they included the fictional prose and stories/legends/songs re-writing history bit in Brianna’s history class. I think most of the discussion of that was in Dragonfly in Amber when Claire was talking to Roger about the Jacobites and how Prince Charles wasn’t the amazing awesomeness that he appears to be in the songs. But it’s great that they managed to get something esoteric and literary like that into the TV show.

Briannas Ornament

Holidays are so hard after loss, especially the first one. Our culture focuses so much on family and togetherness at the holidays, and that’s wonderful when you have a family (whether a family by blood or the family you choose in your friends) around you. But when even one person is missing, gone forever, everything changes. I lost my grandfather last summer, and while it’s nowhere near the same as losing a parent, it still changed so much about our family holiday. There was something more missing than just my grandfather, something greater than the sum of our loss.

So I ache for Brianna, who has lost one father, and is grappling with the existence of another one that she thinks she will never know. This is probably the first time I am really sympathetic toward her in the show so far. I’ve liked her for Roger’s sake but haven’t really warmed to her as a character on her own. But this scene makes me feel for her.

Daft or Brilliant

Wow—Roger in Boston. I guess they’re pulling some ideas from Drums of Autumn. But I like the idea of Roger and Brianna both grieving their adopted fathers at Christmas.

Claire’s struggle with her fears about Jamie and worries about leaving Brianna is poignant but so different from the upswell of emotion and conviction to return from the season two finale. I do understand her not wanting to leave Brianna, especially with Bree being so unsettled about everything she’s learned, to the point of withdrawing from Harvard. But I hope this is where she decides to go to MIT and focus on engineering.

Geillis Skeleton

The Geillis skeleton! Spooky!

“Somebody” tried to cut the lady’s head off with a dull blade. “Somebody”—aka Claire! Except she hasn’t done it yet. But the inclusion of the skeleton tells me we will get to that part of the story in the Caribbean. I wondered what would be cut—they’ve got to cut something, or they’ll never fit everything into the few episodes they have left. But not that. I hope they cut the Fiend, though.

Brianna and Roger at Harvard is a beautiful scene, giving hints of the path she will choose to take with her life in the future. There’s more to like in this episode, and in this scene about Brianna, than we’ve seen so far. The show is doing a good job of opening her up and showing her vulnerabilities. Her character needs that, and I hope they continue to do it.

 

History is a Story

UGH TO THE SHADES OF FUCKING FRANK RANDALL. Why did we have to bring him back through Sandy? I’m fine with Brianna grieving and having complicated thoughts about who she is as a person and who her family is. Frank was her father, even if not by blood. And Claire grieving is fine, too, and her emotions are just as complicated for different reasons. But having this woman throw outright lies at Claire and for Claire to just accept them is terrible and unjust. Claire asked Frank for a divorce when Bree was little, and he wouldn’t give it to her. That’s not Claire’s fault. He chose to stay with Claire. That’s what Claire told Frank’s lover in the books, and I’m pissed as hell that she doesn’t say it here. Sure, Sandy is grieving, and I’m also sure that Frank routinely either lied about or obfuscated his motivations, so I don’t blame her for misunderstanding or for being jealous of Claire’s marriage, but she doesn’t get to make Claire feel guilty about something she could not control. Frank made his own choices, and it wasn’t Claire who refused to let him go. She gave him so many opportunities, and he never took them. UGH. But at least this scene only took a few minutes, and it led to Bree and Claire finally telling each other the truth about everything.

Frank Cheats

I like the inclusion of the Apollo 8 mission, and I’m actually OK with that brief voice over, because it’s a kind of ethereal scene, and having a voice from nowhere sort-of makes sense. And it will give Jamie and Claire a chance to have the conversation on the Artemis, talking about the future and going to the moon.

It’s weird to see Bree and Claire talking about what Claire will miss, since I know she’s not going to miss any of those things—Bree’s wedding or Bree’s kids being born. Yes, she’ll miss a little bit of the kids growing up when Brianna and Roger return to the 80s, but they come back, and will be on the Ridge again in Go Tell the Bees.

I hope we get to continue to see Brianna working through her complicated feelings about her parents next season, since I assume we won’t see her again this season. And positioning her as more like Claire than either Frank or Jamie works well, too, because Claire can be ruthless and seem cold while a lot of very hot emotions are roiling under the surface.

Joe Abernathy

I am so glad they cut out the fat-shaming remarks that Joe makes in the book. That has always bothered me, especially since Claire in the books is written as being short and curvy, and Jamie complains when she loses too much weight. This good-bye scene also works well enough, although it’s odd to me that she doesn’t tell him what she’s about to do. I just checked that scene in the book, and she doesn’t specifically say anything about time travel, but she does have him help her resign and take care of some legal things. He knows she’s going away and doesn’t plan to come back. I wonder why they didn’t have her say goodbye here? The scene was well-staged anyway, but I felt like she would have told him she was going.

It’s so funny that Roger gives Claire the book of Scottish history, since she’s not going to be staying in Scotland long. But that’s how it happened in the book, too. And interesting that they are claiming, in the show, that she had gemstones every time. In the books, her first two trips were just with gold (her wedding band to Frank) and silver (her wedding band to Jamie).

Claire Costumer

Wow—Claire sewing her dress is interesting. And how does she have a dress form? I have a degree in costuming and I don’t even have a dress form (although I want one). The corset pattern is familiar, though. The first corset I ever made was one of that shape. Although she would have needed about a million rain coats to make that skirt and coat, and she would never had had pieces of fabric big enough for those panels. Why didn’t she just buy fabric by the bolt? Lots of people still made their clothes in the 60s—many more than do so now—and if she has a dress form, she would have had access to fabric. But I shall attempt to suspend my disbelief.

Really, though, Claire, what did those poor scissors ever do to you? Didn’t anyone ever teach you to respect your tools? Would you toss your surgical instruments around like that? Not that I can blame you–those look like they would be awful for cutting fabric or thread.

I want to somehow jump into the show and hand her a pair of my Ginghers. She’d have to promise not to use them to cut paper, though. There is only one pair of scissors in that shot, which means she cut out the pattern and the fabric with it. *shudder* I know there are amazing costumers working on this show. Did they not get to have any say in what happened in this scene?? *tears of frustration*

OK, I’m done with my sewing rant. Please forgive me.

Brianna and Claire’s farewell is lovely. I wonder if Brianna will follow her, as she does in the book? Although it’s a little different to follow her from Inverness than from Boston. (Note—she doesn’t, but they also don’t show Claire actually going to the stones. In the post-episode chat, they talk about how going to the stones wouldn’t work, logistically, with their filming schedule. I kinda like that they skipped over it).

Bree Roger Christmas Carol

I’m really, really glad that this whole episode focused on Claire, Brianna, and Roger, rather than showing us what Jamie has been up to since Helwater. But I still think it would have been better to keep the structure from the book and not to try for linear chronology through the forties and fifties. For those that haven’t read the book, the way it was structured is that Claire, Bree, and Roger are searching for Jamie through history in 1968, just like they were doing last week in “Of Lost Things.” As they uncover new information, the book then breaks away to that point in Jamie’s life and we get his point of view for a while. Then it comes back to 1968 for the next revelation, and interspersed in the 1968 section are flashbacks to the forties, fifties, and early sixties in Claire’s life. I think it works really well in the book, because the plot continues to move forward no matter which time period we’re in.

In the show, it has all been fits and starts, with really rocky and jarring transitions between centuries. I guess I can see how this episode worked well on its own, but I would give that up to have a season that seemed to be arcing toward something from the beginning. Those first three episodes showed Claire stuck in one place, with no hope for the future. Jamie was the same—stuck in whatever circumstances he found himself in that week. That’s true of the Jamie segments in the book, too, but the Claire segments from the book keep giving us hope that a reunion is in the future. The show ruthlessly punctured the hopeful bubble of the season two finale, and refused to give back any of that hope, even last episode. This was the first time that I felt like we were actually building toward a reunion. And that’s great within the episode, but it would have been nice to have it back in episode one, too. The season is almost half-over now.

Another Sky

Ooh—the prologue from Voyager! (The bit about puddles). I’m OK with this as voice-over, too, and with it as a transition from twentieth century to eighteenth. Generally speaking, they’ve been much more judicious about the voice over this season, and that’s good. It was so over-used in the first season that I wanted it to be gone forever, but most of it here has worked well enough.

I kept expecting this episode to end every second of the last few minutes of the episode—especially as Claire opened the door of the print shop. But when it continued on after that, I guessed it would end as Jamie crumpled to the floor. And I was right about that!

Jamie Faints

And now, of course, we shall all have to wait two weeks to see what happens next, which is what I expected. Although it seems like it, it’s also not a cliff hanger—those happen when we’re in the middle of conflict and it’s left unresolved. This is absolutely a game changer. Claire has resolved (or well enough) everything that she’s leaving behind in Boston, and now she’s moving forward into a new phase of her story. So while it’s a dramatic moment to end on, and everyone is definitely going to be wondering about the next episode, it’s not really leaving us hanging. Rather, it’s leaving us imagining and hoping and curious.

But, as I said earlier, I’m going to be so busy next weekend I’ll barely notice the wait. Oh, and I saw on the preview that it’s going to be an extended episode, so that’s nice. Maybe they’ll manage to get a lot more plot into the episode that way, or just give themselves extra time to slow down and do the reunion justice.

What did you think of “Freedom and Whisky?” Are you glad, like I am, that they didn’t make up something to fill in Jamie’s part of the story on this episode? Or did you want to see what he was up to in the ten years between Helwater and Edinburgh? Do you hope that they allow Frank’s ghost to rest and never mention his name again? Let me know in the comments!

 

*All images are the property of Starz and used here for entertainment and critique. Quotes on the images are from the show, from Voyager the book, or my own invention.

Episode 304 – Of Lost Things

 

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Last week’s blog post definitely struck a chord with some people—and not necessarily one in tune. Sorry for any misunderstandings, but I have to say I’m not sorry for my opinions. If I got something factually wrong, please feel free to let me know. And I’m open to changing my mind based on different interpretations, so also don’t hesitate to tell me what you think. More than once, someone else’s comments have swayed me to a different perspective. But do please try to be courteous to other opinions, and don’t malign or insult anyone who doesn’t agree with you—me, or any other people who comment on my blog. I reserve the right to delete malicious comments.

Now that that’s out of the way, let’s talk about episode 304! I am so glad we’re getting into the meat of the material from Voyager. I think it’s fair to say that one of my many criticisms of the change in focus this season from the book is that we don’t get to spend as much time with Roger and Brianna. They’re going to be much larger players in season four, and it would have been nice to see them more this season—especially since, once Claire returns to the 18th century, we won’t see them again. Unless the show does something really different!

I loved the title card of the carving of the snake. I’m writing this commentary as I watch the episode for the first time, so at this point I assume it’s Jamie carving for Willie (in reverse of the way the original was carved), but I could end up being wrong (nope!). And the snake was lost a time or two—or Jamie believed it was—so the title of the episode (“Of Lost Things”) actually fits with this specific image, and not just thematically with the episode (Jamie is lost to Claire; Claire, William, and his unknown child are lost to Jamie).

Rogers Research Board

Roger’s research boards are fantastic. I tried to freeze-frame and read some of the notes, but they’re just enough out of focus that it’s hard to make out anything but the big “post-its.” I love Roger’s reaction to Claire finding Jamie on the Ardsmuir rolls—“never too early for a whisky.”

Sam is amazing in this episode. The interview with Dunsany is fantastic—he reveals just enough to show the viewer the pain of Jamie’s loss, but he’s also containing it, showing Dunsany that Jamie is the master of his emotions. There’s even a little bit of defiance. That earns him Dunsany’s respect—and a warning to remember that he’s still a prisoner. I liked the inclusion of the phrase “the Scottish prisoner”—a nod to the novel of the same title set during Jamie’s years at Helwater.

Many Faces of Jamie Fraser

Roger is adorable. And so is Bree. The little interlude at the car made me smile. There was a lot of speculation on the internet about why it was Roger under the bonnet and not Bree, but this scene played out wonderfully in reversing expectations.

So did, amazingly, the scene with Jamie and Isobel. She’s young and naïve, but very likable. She’ll be a fantastic adoptive mother for William, and, I think, a good wife for John. She’s pretty much a non-entity in the books, so I’m really glad they’re giving her more of a personality and spirit in the show.

To the commenter who was worried we wouldn’t hear a “Lady Jane”—there it is! I’m a little confused about what they’re trying to portray in the scene with the phone call, though. Is this Claire, torn between her two worlds, or Claire grieving for someone who we haven’t yet met, or something else? Her curtness with ending the phone conversation tells me she’s feeling something very deeply, I’m not just sure what it is. I hope they make whatever it is clear by the end of the episode. (Note—they didn’t. Maybe next week, once she’s back in Boston?).

Marriage to an Earl

Despite how young the actors playing the Dunsany sisters appeared in their headshots, in the show they look much older, and I’m very, very glad of it. They also seem to have picked an actor who looks a lot like Caitriona Balfe to play Geneva—enough that I think it’s going to become part of what happens with Jamie and Geneva. (note—it doesn’t, at least not in any obvious way).

I’m surprised by how much I like Geneva. Oh, she isn’t perfect, and she’s spoiled and headstrong. But I think she cannot be completely awful. She laughs when Jamie drops her in the mud, and is half in love with him. Yes, she goes about everything wrong, but she’s an heiress and is about to be thrust into an untenable situation. She’s grabbing something she wants before she loses her freedom to do so.

Geneva in the Mud

I’m extremely intrigued by the addition of Hal into the Helwater portion! It was delicious to see him, John, and Jamie together, especially since Hal must know very well what John thinks about Jamie. But it makes sense, because it is an easier explanation for how Geneva discovers her blackmail material than the theft of letters.

In the end it’s the same, though—it’s Geneva’s threat to Lallybroch (though much more subtle than in the book) that sways Jamie. And as much as he dislikes her as he comes to her room, there’s a certain angry respect that he has for her as he disrobes. His display of his scars is both reluctant and deliberate.

Jamie Disrobes

Thank God they changed the script in this scene, letting Jamie offer her a way out, and affirming her consent. She’s ruthless in her methods, but it’s because she’s scared and trapped in a situation she can’t control, and is trying to find any way to claim that control. Jamie doesn’t really want to be there, but he’s made his peace with it, and is gentle with her. They definitely improved on what is in the books, while keeping the best of the dialogue from the text—Jamie’s talk of love versus lust, and describing his feelings for Claire. I’m very happy with this adaptive choice!

I’m so glad Brianna kissed Roger first!

Things go a little differently in the show at Ellesmere than they did in the book, but I’m glad they had Isobel and Jamie have a moment—even a moment of anger—to show her mettle. And then a reconciliation afterward, when she comes to terms with her sister’s death and the fact that Jamie is the father of her nephew. And for both Isobel and Lady Dunsany to give Jamie a moment with the child that everyone knows—but will never acknowledge—is his…I wept. And the longing in Jamie’s eyes when she spoke of Scotland—but the knowledge that he has a son, and that his son needs him, keeps him away from the rest of his family. Until leaving him is what will protect him better.

Claire Whisky

Claire’s despair is nearly palpable as she gives up on her search and heads back to Boston. I can’t decide if I like that better as a reason to get her back to the US and encounter Geillis’s skeleton or not. In the book, she goes back to take care of the business of her life, leaving things settled for Brianna as she prepares to go back to the past. Here, she takes Brianna with her in every expectation that they will stay in Boston. Although she’s left the clue of “Freedom and Whisky” for Roger, who I suppose will continue the search on his own in the next episode. So I’ll have to see how everything plays out next week in order to make a more informed decision.

Jamie and John Friendship

Aww. Sadness. The scene where Jamie offers himself to John in return for caring for Willie was well-acted, but I’m disappointed that they didn’t follow the book exactly. Both Sam and David are great, and they both capture the welter of confused emotions both men experience in this scene, so it’s certainly not a criticism of the acting. But I always thought it was sweet and poignant that Jamie kissed John, because he knew what it would mean to John, and his acknowledgment of their friendship and the desire to give John something meaningful overcame his memories of Black Jack Randall. It’s a little odd that they decided to cut it. The handshake with the deliberate touch calling back to the previous episode after the chess game is all well and good, but it’s not really the same. But I shall live with my disappointment.

My heart breaks hearing Jamie talk about a woman out there for Willie—one who might find him. One of the women he cared about in the books is dead, and the other is married to Young Ian. I really hope DG gives him his happy ending soon. Adaptation-wise, giving him the snake is poignant, but not quite as portable as the rosary, and it’s the kind of thing that’s easy to leave behind when you grow up, dismissing it as childish. The rosary is different.

Willies Snake

In the post-episode talk, Toni Graphia says they changed it because the rosary would have been taken from Jamie at Ardsmuir, but I thought it was something that was smuggled to him afterward, once he was at Helwater. I just checked the book and I don’t see anything definitive there about the rosary’s origins, although it’s mentioned in the section when Jamie is thinking about setting up the letters, and in the scene where he baptizes Willie, it’s mentioned that the Virgin Mary statue came from Jenny to Helwater, so that’s probably why I thought the rosary came the same way. I couldn’t find a mention of it in the Ardsmuir section (and it would have been found when he was searched for the gems, or afterward when the tartan was discovered). If anyone has a digital edition and wants to do a search for “rosary” and get a definitive answer, I would appreciate it. Until then, I don’t see why he couldn’t have gotten it from Jenny, although they didn’t establish in the show that he was communicating with his family, either.

But this is one of those changes that will ripple outward and make later meetings different. It’s especially noticeable in this episode, when Claire gets Ellen Fraser’s pearls back and will, presumably, give them to Brianna before she returns through the stones. And then Brianna will bring them with her when she follows her mother a year or so later. Not that these pearls are nearly as distinctive as the ones described in the book, but I suppose they’ll do the trick well enough when she lays them before the Murrays and Laoghaire.

Plot Relevant Pearls

Jamie’s face just before the final fade to black makes me cry. Even though he knows John and Isobel will take care of Willie, and raise him to be a good man, it tears him apart to leave behind his son.

The preview for next week makes it seem like Claire will return by the end of the next episode, which is good. I do wonder what they’re going to show us of Jamie’s life between leaving Helwater and when Claire returns. I know some people think they will actually show his marriage, but I don’t think they will. I think they’ll save that to shock viewers just as Claire is shocked.

What did you think of this episode? I didn’t feel nearly as jolted by the back-and-forth between time periods this week, probably because there was more care drawn to connect them thematically. It still isn’t unnoticeable, but it worked better, especially the closing scenes where both Claire and Jamie are leaving precious things behind.

Let me know your opinion in the comments. But remember—be respectful. Thanks!

 

(images are the property of Starz and are used here for entertainment value and to provide additional commentary on the episode)

Episode 303 – All Debts Paid

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This week’s episode has some awesome moments and some great adaptive choices–and some truly terrible ones.

The title card makes me think of pictures of my birthday parties as a kid, even though this would be several decades before my childhood. I had a big black lab, though, so it was nice to see the dog, even if he didn’t show up much otherwise.

I appreciate the chyrons telling us the year in this episode—did I miss that in the last episode? Although they don’t “update” us as time passes in Boston, so that was a little weird. I wish they wouldn’t have started on this conceit of dual time periods. It doesn’t make sense. Last week, we were only a year after Culloden for Claire and seven years later for Jamie. This week, Jamie’s story covers several months, or maybe a year, while Claire’s spans at least ten or so.

The introduction of Lord John was interesting. I understand why they moved the conversation from the offices to the yard (allowing John to see Jamie, and vice versa), but it felt less personal that way between Harry Quarry and John.

Murtagh Fitzgibbons

MURTAGH OMG. I feel so much joy right now, I can’t even describe it. I am so, so glad he didn’t die.

If they replace the role filled by Duncan Innes in the books with Murtagh I will be beside myself with happiness. To get to have him that far into the future would be amazing. Weird that they set up the plaid and then didn’t pay it off, though. Maybe we’ll get that as a flashback later? Or was it just a nod for book readers? But I’ll get to that at the end of the blog.

I kinda hate that Frank and Claire have agreed to an open relationship. Not because I’m against open relationships or polyamory, but because Claire clearly doesn’t want to be in one. Not that she really wants to be married to Frank anymore, either, but it would be better for both of them to divorce and share custody of Brianna. And it’s another way to try and soften Frank as a character. In the book, he still slept around, and was still “discreet,” but without Claire’s—forced? Or feels as though it’s forced?—agreement.

It’s taking a while for any kind of plot to develop in this episode. I was distracted by Murtagh being alive and the implications of that at first, but now I’m wondering when the story is going to start and how it is going to manage to work in both time periods. So far, it just feels like it’s a straight line: this happened, and then this happened, and then this happened.

The Randalls

Now I see–there’s a discussion of divorce, and why they’re not getting one. I’m happy the episode at least engaged with the problem and didn’t flinch away. But it really doesn’t make sense for Frank to disagree. His stab about Claire not keeping her promises is entirely unfounded. She has practically twisted herself into a pretzel to keep her promises to him since coming back to the twentieth century. As she says in their next argument, she has been faithful to him since her return.

It’s still so weird that Arsdmuir is happening at basically one point in time, and we’re jumping forward in huge leaps in Boston. I really can’t understand why they didn’t keep the arc the same as in the books. It made so much more sense to have them searching for clues about Jamie in 1968, and then to see what really happened to him that those clues uncovered—and for Claire to flash back to what was happening to her in the same time, relative to when she returned from Culloden. This is just super awkward, and it doesn’t feel like we’re actually getting a story arc. It’s just a timeline with punctuations.

But oh my GOD, I am so happy that it’s Murtagh in prison with Jamie. It gives him a single person who knows, who can talk to him and unburden his soul. It was something Gabaldon deliberately withheld from him in the book, but for the purposes of the television show it works better giving him someone to talk to. (Edited to add–I meant that it works better because otherwise things we learn in dialogue would have to be given via the dreaded voice over. And no one wants that!)

Jamie and John are SO CUTE and it hurts my heart to know that John is going to fall so hard. And then, to have Jamie recount the meal to the men—who want to hear about every morsel—is even worse (in terms of my heart hurting). All that is left to them is vicarious flavor, and I’m so sad for them. (Note that a commenter misconstrued what I meant here, so let me clarify–I realize that they are excited to hear about Jamie’s meal. But it’s so tragic that they can’t all be out, living their lives, and eating their own good food. That’s why I’m sad for them.)

Turnabout

The aftermath of Jamie’s escape and the juxtaposition of the night at Corrieyairack was good in theory, but I didn’t need the actual flashbacks. I suppose they’re there for anyone who hasn’t watched the previous seasons (although it seems weird to jump in on season three in the post-streaming era. It’s easy to binge-watch seasons one and two on Amazon, the Starz app, or blu-ray). But otherwise, I loved watching the back-and-forth between Jamie and John. The seeds of their future friendship are being sown here, and it’s gorgeous to watch.

I love you so much, John Grey. It takes a special sort of man to earn Jamie’s approval and respect, even if he’s still lying to you. My heart fluttered a bit at the blue sapphire–especially knowing its future. And a special sort of man to honor his debts and send a doctor for Murtagh, even when he could easily have done otherwise. I like watching Jamie’s opinion of him shift and grow.

John and Jamie Chess

I’ve imagined the scene with John and Jamie and the chess game—and John taking Jamie’s hand—so many times, and it definitely lived up to my expectations. So much pain on both sides—so many bad memories, and good ones that hurt because they are memories, and not reality. John is mortified and so full of longing, and Jamie is angry that this new friendship is being marred by demons from his past. I am all-a-tremble, waiting to see Jamie kiss John at Helwater.

It’s weird that Claire and Frank are having this fight about Brianna after she has graduated and is eighteen. Again, it’s trying to make Frank seem reasonable and Claire seem…well…crazy. Because it doesn’t make sense for her to hold on this tight after Bree is grown. She would be leaving for college anyway, and living on her own. It’s part of growing up. So it just makes Claire seem shrewish to fight over where Bree is going to go to college, or to be so possessive of her now that she’s an adult. In the book, the fight made sense. Brianna was still in high school, and Claire rightfully didn’t want to tear her away from her friends in her senior year. It’s so unfathomable why the show has to do this—except that there is obviously a mandate somewhere that Frank Randall must be written as a saint at all times. What the hell?

Trip to Helwater

I wonder if they are going to write out Duncan Innes and use Murtagh in that role. My first assumption is that they will, but I don’t know how they’ll explain him being in Edinburgh when Claire returns. Murtagh didn’t lose his arm and that was the reason for Duncan not to be transported when Ardsmuir closed. Maybe Murtagh escaped and made his way back to Scotland? I suppose we’ll see in two weeks–or next season when we get to America. Next week’s episode is going to deal with Helwater, Geneva Dunsany, and William, but I’m guessing the one after that will be about Jamie going to Edinburgh and getting involved in smuggling. I think they’ll conveniently gloss over the few years at Lallybroch where he married Laoghaire. They won’t want to spoil that surprise for non-book-readers after Claire returns to the 18th century.

I don’t understand why the show cut the flogging, especially after making it seem at the beginning of the episode (at least to book readers) that Jamie was going to take the punishment on Murtagh’s behalf. For those of you who haven’t read the books, in Voyager, it is a young Jacobite in the prison who still has the scrap of tartan, and it’s discovered right after the chess game when John makes his subtle “move” on Jamie. Jamie claims the tartan is his, and John has no choice but to have Jamie flogged—it’s the law. In the book, it’s Jamie’s way of reestablishing their relationship and the power dynamic, which is heavily weighted in John’s favor. And it’s even more of a shock for Jamie when John gets him moved to Helwater. I suppose the story still makes sense without the flogging, but it feels like a missed opportunity.

Lord John Cries

In broad strokes, this episode ended up where I thought it would. I’m more than pleased with the performances by Sam Heughan and David Berry. Lord John is one of my favorite characters in fiction, and although David Berry’s portrayal isn’t exactly like I imagined, he’s pretty damned close. And as the writers said in the post-mortem for the show, he can hold his own with Sam. I can’t wait to see him and Claire meeting on the deck of the Porpoise.

It’s going to sound callous, but wow, am I glad that Frank is dead. I have been consistently frustrated and baffled by the changes made to his character on the show. I am all for wanting to make him into a better man, but in order to make the plot points move in the same direction as the book, they had to shift all of the problems (or most of them) onto Claire. And she doesn’t deserve that. Claire in the books is no saint, and she has many, many flaws. But what they did to her in the show is beyond awful. So yeah, I’m glad Frank is dead. Now we can move on.

Next week, we’re back to Scotland and Roger!! My two favorite characters (Roger and Lord John) will now be on the show at the same time, and that makes me super happy!

What did you think of this week’s episode? Are you also happy Frank is dead? Let me know in the comments!