Updates to the Season Three Page

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We have episode titles for Season Three, and that means some adjustments to my episode breakdown. I am getting a lot of traffic going to the blog where I did the breakdown and I’ve put a note there to go to the Season Three Speculation page instead.

In the meantime, I want to rant a little about my feelings now that the titles are revealed. Here they are, in case you don’t want to read through the whole breakdown to see them:

  1. The Battle Joined (9/10)
  2. Surrender (9/17)
  3. All Debts Paid (9/24)
  4. Of Lost Things (10/1)
  5. Freedom and Whiskey (10/8)
  6. A. Malcolm (10/22) *note the break here!
  7. Crème de Menthe (10/29)
  8. First Wife (11/5)
  9. The Doldrums (11/12)
  10. Heaven and Earth (11/19)
  11. Turtle Soup (11/26)
  12. The Bakra (The Slave Master) (12/3)
  13. A New World (12/10)

So, if you’ve read the books, you understand why I’m peeved. “A. Malcolm” is clearly the episode where Jamie and Claire are reunited…and it’s halfway through the season.

Any way you look at it, that is just a bad idea. Storytelling-wise, it’s terrible. Even Gabaldon got Jamie and Claire back together before the end of the first third of the book. They are the heart of this series, and if they expect us to stick around through several more seasons as the story starts to splinter, they need to make that heart solid–which is not accomplished by that timeline.

Even looking at it logistically, it doesn’t make sense.

My copy of Voyager has 870 pages. Chapter 23, where Claire travels back to 1766, begins on page 244. I assume the episode will cover material through chapter 25, which ends on page 289. That number divided by six episodes is about 48 pages per episode. There are 580 pages left in the book to be divided over seven episodes–which is a whopping 83 pages per episode.

I don’t even know how they’re going to do that unless they strip out several subplots. Although, to be honest, I wouldn’t mind losing the Fiend storyline, which will save some time both in Edinburgh and at the end–although it will also mean losing the conjuring scene with Margaret Campbell, too.

Some people have also speculated that the season will end on a cliffhanger somewhere before the end of Voyager, but from the title of the last episode I am pretty sure it will end where the book ends. Technically the West Indies are part of the “New World,” but I feel somewhat confident in applying it specifically to America in this instance.

But I’m not even sure how I feel about that, because it means they’re going to try to shove so much of the book into so little episode time.

The only thing to do now, though, is what and see what they do. I wish I believed I could trust the writers implicitly, but they’ve already proved that they don’t always make choices in service of the characters and the story. Sometimes they go for spectacle and shock value, and that’s not interesting to me at all.

*fingers crossed*


Need something to get you through these last few days until Outlander begins? You may like my Fay of Skye series. Set in an alternate Victorian Era, the books are full of magic, romance, Scotsmen, and strong women who know what they want and aren’t afraid to fight for it.

The series starts with Essential Magic. A Theft of Magic and Memories of Magic are already available, and the fourth book, Secret Magic, will be released right after season three ends. Check out Essential Magic now!

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Season Three Premiere Date!

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OK, so there isn’t an actual date yet, but we do know it will air in September.

EDITED TO ADD: THE OFFICIAL DATE IS SEPTEMBER 10!!

Despite adding about five months to Droughtlander, this is actually a good thing. I feel that some of the problems with Season 2 could have been avoided if they’d had more time during the filming and early production process. So I’m crossing my fingers for some wise decisions to be made about the ship-going and island portion of the story.

Along with the September premiere date, Starz also released a summary of the season (basically the same as the one they already put out, but edited a little), which does not bode well:

The story picks up right after Claire (Caitriona Balfe) travels through the stones to return to her life in 1948. Now pregnant with Jamie’s (Sam Heughan) child, she struggles with the fallout of her sudden reappearance and its effect on her marriage to her first husband, Frank (Tobias Menzies). Meanwhile, in the 18th century, Jamie suffers from the aftermath of his doomed last stand at the historic battle of Culloden, as well as the loss of Claire. As the years pass, Jamie and Claire attempt to make a life apart from one another, each haunted by the memory of their lost love. The budding possibility that Claire can return to Jamie in the past breathes new hope into Claire’s heart… as well as new doubt. Separated by continents and centuries, Claire and Jamie must find their way back to each other. As always, adversity, mystery, and adventure await them on the path to reunion. And the question remains: When they find each other, will they be the same people who parted at the standing stones, all those years ago?

I realize that they’re trying to build up tension, but let’s face it. More than half (if not significantly more than that) of their viewers have read the books, either before the show ever aired, on in response to seeing the show. We all know that Jamie and Claire are going to get back together and Things Will Happen™. So the fact that they’re putting so much emphasis on the time apart makes me think that we’re looking at more than a few episodes of separation.

When I did my season three speculation episode breakdown, I figured on about three episodes before the print shop in Edinburgh. There’s an awful lot to cover during the years apart, particularly for Jamie. But I also wrote my breakdown assuming the series would pick up in 1968 with Bree, Roger, and Claire. Obviously we’re going to get there because we have Joe Abernathy cast, but that summary basically says that the season will start in 1948 and 1746 concurrently.

Sigh. More freaking Frank.

The only good thing I can think of is that, after he’s dead, we will never see him again except in the rare dream/flashback. Same with BJR. And we have at least one more season after this one to live in the blissful world post-Randalls.

Den of Geek has a very comprehensive post about the latest news here.


In other news, I have obviously not yet done my Voyager re-read. I’m a terrible blogger, I know. I’ve been having a rough winter here with illness, injury, accidents, and holidays keeping me away from my keyboard. Plus I have a rather busy writing schedule for my fantasy romance series and a day job. So this blog is on hiatus, barring any Outlander news, for the next few months at least. I’m hoping to come back for the re-read sometime in the summer, a few months before the show returns.

Until then, try to get through Droughtlander as best as you can!

Speculation – Season Three Episode Breakdown

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EDIT: With the episode titles now released (as of late August), this post is kinda obsolete. It remains an example of how *I* would have broken down the episodes, but for my up-to-date speculation, please visit the “Season Three Speculation” page where I’ve updated based on the episode titles.


You guys, this took a really, really long time to do. I have HUGE amounts of sympathy for the Outlander writers.

Although I followed the book exactly, I don’t think they will. At least, I hope they won’t. I’ve broken up the book into more-or-less equal chunks, and I haven’t deviated from the plot at all. But many of those chunks don’t hold together, narratively-speaking. There isn’t a strong sense that these are individual stories making up a bigger story. Some work as individual pieces, and others don’t work at all when taken on their own. So I really hope the season doesn’t end up looking exactly like this!

When Season Three starts, I’ll update each episode breakdown after it airs, so that this page will stand as a summary for the season. (The Season Two summary is here, and eventually I’ll do a Season One summary. Eventually!)

UPDATE:

Starz/Tallship have released a synopsis for the season. Here it is:

“Book Three” will be based on the third of the eight books in the Outlander series, entitled Voyager, The third season of “Outlander” picks up right after Claire travels through the stones to return to her life in 1948.  Now pregnant, she struggles with the fallout of her sudden reappearance and its effect on her marriage to her first husband, Frank.  Meanwhile, in the 18th century, Jamie suffers from the aftermath of his doomed last stand at the historic battle of Culloden, as well as the loss of Claire.  As the years pass, Jamie and Claire attempt to make a life apart from one another, each haunted by the memory of their lost love.  The budding possibility that Claire can return to Jamie in the past breathes new hope into Claire’s heart… as well as new doubt.  Separated by continents and centuries, Claire and Jamie must find their way back to each other.  As always, adversity, mystery, and adventure await them on the path to reunion.  And the question remains: when they find each other, will they be the same people who parted at the standing stones, all those years ago?

source-Starz via outlandertvnews.com

What does this mean for my episode breakdown? Well, it means we’re probably not going to get the 1960s in Episode One. I always knew they would do flashbacks to Frank (and Bree’s childhood), but I’d hoped they would be just that–flashbacks–not the primary action for the Claire half of the episodes. So I’m a little disappointed, but I can’t say I’m surprised. Ron Moore’s love affair with Frank continues!

UPDATE #2: And with BJR, apparently. This EW slideshow has a quote saying that they’ve filmed more of the battle of Culloden than was represented in the book. So maybe we’ll actually see BJR die. Not sure how I feel about that.

UPDATE #3 – So, despite my having read in one of Maril Davis’s interviews that there would again be 13 episodes this season, I have heard elsewhere that there will only be 10. That means I have to totally re-think this breakdown. There has also been talk that Claire and Jamie won’t be reunited until halfway through the season. Which is baffling. In any case, what is represented here is what happens in the book. So take that as you will!
UPDATE #3A – Also, IMDB now has 13 episodes listed and I’ve seen in several places where the writers/producers refer to 13 episodes. So I think that we’re firm on 13. However, there are also three tentative titles on IMDB. They are highly suspect, since it’s only episodes 3, 4, and 5 that have titles, but the episode 5 title, “Freedom and Whiskey” makes me think that that will be the episode when Jamie and Claire are reunited. A whole episode later than I’d have wanted, but two episodes earlier than I feared. WHEW.  NOPE. See next update. Sigh.

UPDATE #4 – We now have the complete season episode titles, and that changes things. For one thing, the fact that episode 6 is titled “A. Malcolm” makes it pretty clear that Jamie and Claire won’t be reunited until HALFWAY THROUGH THE SEASON. WTF? To say I am unhappy about this news is something of an understatement. For reference, Claire returns to the 18th century in chapter 23 of the book, which begins on page 244 of the hardcover edition I have. The book is 870 pages. A very modest understanding of math tells me that Claire returns well before the first third of the book is over (page 290). So I have no idea what they’re going to do with the extra 350 pages of the book. Even more egregious is that it looks like they’ve added another “not from the books” episode, likely dealing with Jamie as a smuggler before Claire returns. I just can’t even right now.

OK, here goes:

Outlander Season Three Episode Breakdown

EPISODE ONE  – THE DUNBONNET

  • 1746
    • Jamie wakes after Culloden. Black Jack Randall’s dead body lies on top of him. Some other Highlanders find him and they hide in a cottage. But the English find them. The major in charge is one Lord Melton – the older brother of John William Grey. In exchange for saving John’s life, Hal spares Jamie’s, and sends him back to Lallybroch.
  • 1968
    • Roger and Bree convince Claire not to go jump through the stones immediately. They should try to track Jamie down in history first, so she knows where to go, and can be certain that he didn’t die.
  • 1746
    • Jamie arrives at Lallybroch. He is very badly wounded and his leg is infected. Jenny scalds it with boiling water and he survives.
  • 1968
    • Bree finds the story of the Dunbonnet
  • 1746-1752
    • Jamie lives in the cave. He comes down from time to time. Ian is imprisoned in the Tollbooth. Jenny has her baby and the soldiers come. She lies and says the baby has died to protect Jamie hiding with the bairn in the wardrobe.
  • 1968
    • Roger receives a packet from the historian Linklater with passages from Hal’s journal. Claire flashes back to 1949/1950 when Bree was a baby and remembers the ruined dinner party.
  • 1752
    • Fergus loses his hand when he tries to protect Jamie from a British patrol. Jamie decides it is time to give himself up in exchange for the reward money. Mary MacNab visits him in the cave.
  • 1968
    • Fiona tells the story she knows of the Dunbonnet and how he gave himself up and went to prison so that his people could live off the reward money. They decide to start looking at prison rolls.

EPISODE TWO – ARDSMUIR

  • 1968
    • Claire talks about becoming a doctor; flashbacks to trouble balancing motherhood and medical school – Frank takes Bree with him to work; Roger talks about becoming a historian. Claire finds Jamie on a roll at Ardsmuir.
  • 1755
    • Harry Quarry turns the prison over to its new governor, Lord John Grey. LJG realizes he has Jamie in his power, but resolves to avoid him. Jamie is known now as MacDubh, and is pretty much the laird of Ardsmuir. All of the men look to him.
    • A man is found, delirious and speaking in Gaelic. Lord John must ask Jamie to translate because the one thing they know is that he speaks of French gold. Jamie agrees to a bargain. Jamie learns more than what he tells John, and keeps exactly to the bargain while still escaping. He finds gems and coins, and hides them on an island, but when John blackmails him, he tells him he threw the gems into the sea. He produces a single gem that he swallowed. He says he ran because he was hoping for some sign that his wife was still alive.
    • John and Jamie begin having meals together and playing chess. John falls in love with Jamie, but Jamie can’t abide another man’s touch after BJR.
    • After they part in anger, Jamie takes a flogging that should have been given to another man. John thinks Jamie is doing it to hurt him. Jamie is doing it to remind him of their relative positions in the world, and because that’s what lairds do.
    • Even wounded and surrounded by his men, Jamie is still fundamentally alone.
  • 1968
    • Roger finds Jamie’s pardon. Claire goes back to Boston.

EPISODE THREE – HELWATER (TITLE PER IMDB–NOT TRUSTWORTHY–ALL DEBTS PAID)

  • 1968/1950s
    • Flashback to Claire meeting Joe Abernathy. Claire visits her house and flashes to the night Frank died, after he told her he was leaving her and taking Bree.
  • 1756
    • Jamie and John arrive at Helwater.
    • ???Lord John mysteries???
  • 1758
    • Geneva Dunsany stalks Jamie; blackmails him into sleeping with her before her wedding.
    • Geneva dies giving birth to baby William. Jamie kills Lord Ellesmere to save his son’s life.
    • Events of the Scottish Prisoner??
  • 1761/2
    • Jamie realizes that William is starting to look like him. He already knows that the Dunsany’s suspect William’s parentage, but they are grateful to him for saving the boy’s life, and offer to help him however they can. Jamie finally asks John and them to get him a pardon so he can go back to Scotland.
    • Jamie leaves Helwater, and baptizes his son before he goes. He gives him the baptismal name “James” and gives him his wooden rosary.
  • 1968
    • Claire closes her house in Boston and visits Joe. She helps him with some bones found in the Caribbean; these are the bones of Gillian Edgars/Geillis Duncan…and the wound in her skull is one Claire herself will/has already inflicted. TIME TRAVEL WIBBLY WOBBLY.
    • Claire confesses everything to Joe. He tells her she should go back (except that in the show Claire had absolutely no reservations…maybe their meeting will go differently?)

EPISODE FOUR – A. MALCOLM, PRINTER (TITLE PER IMDB–NOT TRUSTWORTHY–OF LOST THINGS)

  • 1968
    • Roger finds Jamie’s folio and the anachronistic Burns reference. Claire plans her trip. Goes through the stones.
  • 1766
    • Claire travels to Edinburgh and goes to the print shop. Jamie thinks she’s a ghost, then faints when he realizes she’s real. When he wakes, Claire shows him photos of Brianna.
    • Jamie rushes off to take care of Mr. Willoughby. *sigh* Willoughby causes a scene and they have to run to a brothel where Jamie has a room. Misunderstandings abound.
    • Claire and Jamie dance around the awkwardness of 20 years apart, and finally come together.
    • But Jamie is keeping a secret. Claire senses it, although she’s distracted by discussions of smuggling, and by speaking once again to him of Brianna.

EPISODE FIVE – UP IN FLAMES (TITLE PER IMDB–NOT TRUSTWORTHY–FREEDOM AND WHISKEY)

  • In the morning, Ian arrives and more misunderstandings commence. Ian is shocked to see Claire, and tells them he’s come to retrieve his son, Young Ian.
  • Ian and Jamie go out, and while they’re gone, Young Ian shows up. Claire tells him his father is in town, and he runs off, believing Claire to be a prostitute that Jamie and Ian have both visited.
  • Claire has breakfast with the brothel ladies. She learns about a Fiend that has been killing women. She meets Fergus as an adult, who is quickly whisked away by Jamie to deal with their smuggling cargo.
  • Willoughby kills a man who claims to be an exciseman and accosts Claire. His body is disposed of in a wine cask, and Claire finds out that Young Ian is working with Jamie.
  • Jamie takes Claire to dinner and is warned off his usual smuggling route by Sir Percival Turner. They make love in a private dining room and he explains how he became a printer.
  • On their way back to the brothel, they see smoke – it’s Jamie’s printing press. He goes in and rescues it and Young Ian. After they’re all safe, Young Ian tells two versions of his day. In one, he follows a suspicious man into the print shop and sets the fire to stop the man from getting some seditious pamphlets. But really, he was fighting with the man, and had thrown a small lead forge at him. He thinks he has killed a man.
  • Fergus takes Young Ian to drown his sorrows with a lass.
  • In the morning, everyone goes to confession except Claire, who goes to get medical supplies from an apothecary and meets Reverend Campbell. She arranges to meet with his sister, who was severely traumatized post Culloden. She was once betrothed to a friend of Jamie’s.
  • Jamie and Fergus decide to go to the second rendezvous point to meet their cargo, but everything goes wrong and their party is separated. The excisemen have been killed, and Jamie and his people set up for the crime. But they all manage to escape and head back to Lallybroch.

EPISODE SIX – YOU CAN’T GO HOME AGAIN

  • At Lallybroch, Young Ian is castigated by his parents and Jenny reacts to Claire’s return. Ian makes Jamie give Young Ian his punishment as a way to punish them both.
  • Jamie tells Claire the true story of the seal cove and the treasure – he didn’t throw it into the sea as he told John Grey. The treasure is still there, with gemstones and ancient coins.
  • Claire and Jamie are interrupted mid-coitus by Marsali MacKimmie and Laoghaire Fraser. Claire gets understandably upset, and she and Jamie argue. They have angry, loud sex until Jenny comes in and tosses water on them. While Jamie is gone, Jenny helps Claire clean up and leave.
  • Halfway to Craigh na Dun, Young Ian catches up to Claire. Jamie has been shot by Laoghaire and is dying.
  • Claire returns, and uses some of her precious penicillin to keep him from dying from fever after the gunshot wound. They are both still angry, but Jamie explains how the marriage happened, and how it had failed.
  • All of the Murray family arrives, and Claire enjoys the company. Soon Laoghaire, her brother, and Ned Gowan come to tell Jamie that they are suing him. A settlement is reached, but in order to pay Laoghaire, Jamie must go fetch a jewel from the seals’ cove. They take Young Ian and plan to go to Paris and stay with Jared, where Ian can go to school.
  • But at the seals’ cove, Young Ian is taken by men on a rowboat, along with the treasure.

EPISODE SEVEN – FORCES OF NATURE

(NOTE – I would totally cut all of the stuff in France)

  • In France, Jared puts Jamie in charge of the Artemis and they get ready to sail after the Bruja, the ship that took Young Ian. It’s headed for the West Indies.
  • While in France, they meet with one of the Rothschilds, who indicates that coins matching the ones in the treasure were owned by the Duke of Sandringham.
  • Even though they go separately in the book, I would absolutely have Claire and Jamie go together to visit Faith’s grave. And Claire will speak with Mother Hildegarde, but Master Raymond is gone.
  • They return to Scotland to pick up their crew, made up of the smugglers (because Jamie suspects one is a traitor), and Fergus brings Marsali MacKimmie (Laoghaire’s oldest daughter) on board. They are handfast, but have not yet consummated the wedding. Jamie wants to put her ashore, but Fergus insists that she stay. Jamie says they must not sleep together until their union can be blessed by a priest – which means probably months away, after crossing the ocean.
  • Jamie succumbs to seasickness. Claire makes friends with the ship’s cook, Murphy. Fergus tells Claire that someone has been trying to kill Jamie – there have been a few “accidents” recently. They think it’s one of the men on board, except for Duncan Innes, who is one of Jamie’s Ardsmuir men who lost his arm in prison and doesn’t want Jamie dead.
  • Jamie’s seasickness gets worse until Mr. Willoughby tries acupuncture. (If the character is written out, which would be helpful, Claire could have gotten this knowledge elsewhere). Claire and Jamie sit up and talk about the future – moon landings, and Bree. Jamie looks at the pictures and wonders about what kind of woman she is. Claire says she left a letter, with all of the advice she could think to give.
  • Jamie is feeling the effects of celibacy, since Fergus is in his cabin and Marsali is in Claire’s, and there’s no good place for them to have sex. They talk about what it was like for him in prison. The next day, they find a spoiled cask and throw it out to lure sharks. Murphy relishes the thought of cooking them, since one got his leg. Mr. Willoughby catches a pelican to fish for him. He tells the crew of his escape from China.
  • Marsali and Claire start to warm up to each other, and Marsali talks about her relationship with Fergus and his past. She also asks how not to get pregnant, because she thinks that having babies is what made her mother dislike sex. Claire shows her how to use sponges (not that those are all that effective).
  • While they are talking, a commotion on board signals the arrival of a British man-o-war.

EPISODE EIGHT – WE MEET A PORPOISE

  • The man-o-war has typhoid fever aboard. Claire can’t get it, and wants to help. Jamie is reticent, but she’s insistent, citing her Hippocratic Oath, and hopes it will stop them from pressing too many sailors from the Artemis.
  • Claire starts to get things in order aboard the Porpoise, and they set sail with her still on board. The captain is apologetic, but they must make haste.
  • Claire treats the typhoid epidemic, and her days begin to blur in exhaustion. She becomes friends with the gunner’s wife, Mrs. Johansen, when she needs milk for her patients.
  • Claire goes to speak with the captain one day and he accidentally calls her “Fraser” (she’s using the name Malcolm). He has to leave, and she reads from his logbook that one of the men on board gave him information about Jamie and his smuggling activities.
  • Claire tracks down Harry Tompkins, none other than the man who Young Ian thought he killed. (In the book, he finds her, but I think that robs her of some agency). She withholds medical treatment in exchange for information, and finds out that Sir Percival was behind everything in Edinburgh.
  • One night, she goes on deck and meets the passenger that is responsible for the haste – the new governor of Jamaica, Lord John William Grey. He doesn’t know who she is, and she doesn’t remember him. But they speak about what it feels like to have to watch men die and only being able to do so much, and the responsibility of it. He says, “What it comes to, I think, is the knowledge that you are not God….And the very real regret that you cannot be.”

EPISODE NINE – LAND HO!

  • Claire escapes the Porpoise by jumping overboard and floating on a current between islands. She washes ashore and meets an elderly priest who is quite mad named Father Fogden, and a naturalist named Lawrence Stern. Who coincidentally knows Jamie. Because who doesn’t know Jamie?
  • Claire learns about a cave called Abandawe on Hispaniola, which is considered sinister and sacred. She also learns that Father Fogden has been defrocked because he ran away with an upper class woman named Ermenegilda from Habana, Cuba.
  • The Artemis runs aground, but Jamie isn’t with the ship. The sailors and Claire try to get it back in the water.
  • Jamie got aboard the Porpoise, but Claire was already gone. Then he was imprisoned, and during a storm, Mrs. Johansen got him overboard. He washes up on a beach and pretends to be French when he meets some island children. They tell him that the Bruja—and Ian—have recently been in port.
  • A group of soldiers arrives at Artemis. Jamie is with them, and tells them that if they get the ship into the water they can have it. But he double-crosses them, and his men launch the ship and take the soldiers prisoner.
  • Claire de-louses Jamie and his beard. Marsali and Fergus are “officially” wed by Father Fogden. Jamie gives Fergus the name Fraser. The wedding reminds Claire of her choice to be with Jamie.

EPISODE TEN – WORLDS UNKNOWN

  • The Artemis hauls bat guano from Barbados to Jamaica to a certain Mr. Grey’s sugar plantation.
  • Jamie speaks with Master Masons in the West Indies asking about news of Ian and the Bruja.
  • Claire freaks out when she sees a slave auction and causes a scene. The only way to get out of it without violence is for Jamie to purchase the man, Temeraire.
  • But they do learn something at the auction site – the Bruja’s cargo included some slaves with previous owners. One is a Mrs. Abernathy of Rose Hall, Jamaica. They plan to head there to unload their cargo and speak to her. But first, they have to check the pile of dead bodies ready for burning, in case Ian died aboard the ship and was unloaded there. The experience triggers Jamie’s PTSD about Culloden.
  • Claire tries to free Temeraire, but the others argue that he won’t be able to make a living as a one-armed former slave. (This SUPER bothers me, and I hope the show cuts it).
  • The pirates from the Bruja board the Artemis. Claire is wounded trying to save her and Marsali’s lives. Jamie and Fergus have the unusual experience of doctoring Claire, but Mr. Willoughby sews her up.
  • Claire says that her wound hurts, and Jamie says that he was worried because she didn’t think it hurt when it happened. That mortal wounds don’t hurt. She asks how he knows, and he says Murtagh told him. Then he tells her what he remembers of Culloden and how Murtagh died.
  • Claire learns that they have a prisoner from the Bruja. Claire patches him up and eventually he tells them his name is Ishmael and he’s from one of the islands. He tells them about the 12 Scots boys in the hold of the ship. Claire drifts into a kind of trance while he talks, and thinks that he might be an ancestor of her friend Joe Abernathy. (I am assuming this is some kind of time-traveler skill, like the way she can diagnose things by touching). This seems to mesh with the fact that her unwanted slave was owned by someone named Abernathy and that Ishmael has removed a brand from himself that was in a similar location to Temeraire’s.
  • Claire’s wound gets infected and she has Jamie inject her with penicillin. He can’t do it at first, and she has to start it herself. But when he sees how much it hurts, he takes over. Claire tells him about a patient that she helped commit suicide in Boston. Shortly after that, she was moved up to administration so she would have little patient contact. That was right before she went to Scotland with Bree and found out Jamie was alive.
  • Jamie and Claire discuss the future, and possibly moving to America. Jamie could become a printer in one of the larger cities. Murphy sends Claire some turtle soup laced heavily with sherry. Claire gets quite tipsy and she and Jamie have fever-drunk sex, during which Mr. Stern tries to come in and Jamie attempts to tell him nicely to go away, but ends up shouting at him. (This is many people’s favorite sex scene in all of the books).

EPISODE ELEVEN – PROMISED LAND

  • When the Artemis arrives in Kingston, Jamaica, the Porpoise is there. Claire explains that they were bringing the new governor. When Jamie hears the name, he explains that they’re friends, and that John was in charge of Ardsmuir Prison.
  • Ishmael and Temeraire head into the hills of Jamaica, most likely to join with a band of Maroons.
  • The Frasers settle in at Jared’s plantation. They learn that Reverend Campbell has arrived, and that there is gossip about Mrs. Abernathy and the way Mr. Abernathy died. They also find out that there’s a ball being held to welcome the new governor. Jamie decides to attend.
  • Since Jamie is a wanted man, they decide to masquerade as French couple – Etienne Alexandre and his wife, Claire. John finds Claire first, and is pleased to see her. She introduces her husband, and John is floored to realize it’s Jamie. And that this isn’t any woman, this is his lost wife, Claire.
  • Claire mingles and gossips and finds out that everyone thinks Mr. Abernathy perished under suspicious circumstances. Reverend Campbell is there, and goes on a diatribe about the Jacobites. His sister is missing, and he wants help from the governor to find her.
  • Jamie and John meet privately. Claire overhears them talking, and witnesses them embracing, and sees the way John looks at Jamie – and how much Grey is in love with her husband.
  • Claire can’t face Jamie, because she can’t reconcile his friendship with a man who is in love with him with his past with BJR. So she goes to the retiring room and stumbles upon a dead woman. The assumption is that Mr. Willoughby killed her, so as his friend, Jamie is questioned. Fergus takes Marsali home, and Claire speaks with John. The captain of the Porpoise arrives and Claire pretends a swoon so she won’t be recognized. John plays along until the captain leaves. Claire is still jealous, and she and John talk, and John mentions Willie. Claire has no idea who he means, until he shows her the portrait of the little boy. John explains what he knows of the circumstances of William’s birth.
  • Flashback to Helwater, and the day Jamie asked John to look after William. He offers himself in exchange, and although it is what John wants more than anything in the world, he turns down the offer. It is beneath his honor, and Jamie’s. But Jamie kisses him before he goes.
  • Back in Jamaica, John says that he ought to have recognized her, and reminds her of the night before Prestonpans. Then John says one of my absolute favorite lines from the series, about how he feels about Jamie: “To know that you cannot give them happiness, not through any fault of yours or theirs, but only because you were not born the right person for them?” And of course, Claire does know that. It is her relationship with Frank, exactly. When they part, they acknowledge that they liked each other at their first meeting on the Porpoise. Now, there is something very big and awkward between them – their love for Jamie Fraser.
  • Claire and Jamie talk about William. Jamie explains the circumstances of William’s birth, and talks about loneliness, and longing, and how that is why he married Laoghaire. He thinks it may be what Willoughby felt and why he might have murdered the girl. He also explains that he didn’t tell her about William because he’d have to tell her about Geneva, and how would she believe that he has only ever loved her? But she says, if he tells her, she’ll believe him, because she loves him, and will keep him honest. They reaffirm their marriage vows.

EPISODE TWELVE – THE SCENT OF GEMSTONES

  • Jamie and Claire visit Rose Hall. Mrs. Abernathy is actually Geillis Duncan/Gillian Edgars. She plays coy, and talks to Claire about time travel, the Rising, and how she survived being burned as a witch. She escaped to France and tried to help the Rising there. She also talks about zombies – men who have been drugged and made susceptible to suggestion. Jamie goes to help on the estate in an attempt to look around, and Claire tries to help with healing some of Geillis’s house slaves. Claire tries to question the house girls about Ian, but they won’t talk. When she goes back to see Geillis, she is looking at the pictures of Brianna. Then she realizes that Claire has gone through the stones three times. Geillis has the gemstones from the seals’ cove, and is keeping them in case she needs to travel again.
  • As Jamie and Claire leave, Reverend Archie Campbell arrives. They come back at night, to find Campbell still there and Geillis gone. Campbell is suspicious, but talks to her about the Brahan Seer prophecies (note – important for later in the series!). Mr. Willoughby arrives and tells Claire that Archie is the Fiend from Edinburgh who was killing women, and is the one who killed the girl at the ball. Mr. Willoughby kills Campbell, and admits that he is the one who gave away Jamie back in Edinburgh. Then he flees.
  • Claire searches for clues to where Geillis has gone. The clue is the prophecy that the line of Lovat will produce Scotland’s next ruler. And the only person alive in the 20th century from Lovat’s line is Brianna Randall. Geillis is going back.
  • Claire tries to meet back up with Jamie and Lawrence Stern, but stumbles onto some slaves instead. They are about to rise up against the plantation owners, and are summoning spirits. They have Margaret Campbell with them, and she is the mouthpiece for their summoning. During the ceremony, she even channels Brianna, who speaks to Jamie and Claire. Jamie makes Ishmael tell them where Geillis has gone—to the cave of Abandawe, on Hispaniola. They run toward Ian, while the escaped slaves begin their uprising.

EPISODE THIRTEEN – VOYAGER

  • John offers Jamie his boat, and Jamie says they’ll have to steal it so John won’t be implicated. John offers Claire sanctuary, but Claire must go to Abandawe. John misunderstands, and Claire wishes she could tell him the truth, but he is hurt when he says goodbye.
  • Jamie forces Fergus to stay behind with Marsali, and then they set off for Hispaniola. On the boat, they discuss philosophy with Stern, and religion, and science. Duncan Innes takes control of the ship while they go inland.
  • Claire starts having visions of Geillis, and is drawn toward Abandawe. In the cave, Jamie holds tightly to her in the darkness, because they are both afraid she will be drawn back into the time passage.
  • Geillis has Ian – she planned to kill him and use his blood to pass through time. When Geillis threatens Brianna, Claire goes into a blood rage, and kills Geillis with the axe she meant to use on Ian.
  • Ian, Jamie, and Claire manage to get out of the cave and into the storm with the gemstones, but Claire and Ian are terrified.
  • Lawrence leads them back to the jungle, and Claire treats Jamie’s wound, only to find he has a pistol ball in his scalp. She removes it, then goes into shock. When she wakes, she hears Ian telling Jamie about what happened at Rose Hall, and how the other boys had all died. Then I really, really, hope that they don’t keep the part with Geillis raping Ian, but if they do, I hope they treat it as rape, and without any overtones that Ian wanted it or participated willingly.
  • If Geillis rapes Ian, Claire treats him with penicillin, as she believes Geillis was suffering from advanced syphilis. Then they go back to the coast.
  • There, they meet the men, and get back on the boat, which is being pursued by the Porpoise. They were really after the escaped slaves on a different ship, but would be happy enough to recover their governor’s stolen vessel.
  • The Porpoise chases them into a hurricane. They manage to get through the storm (the Porpoise is swamped and goes down with all hands, including Captain Leonard), but have no idea where they are. Eventually, they sight land, and shortly after that, the topmast snaps and drags Claire into the water. She’s tangled in rigging and her leg breaks. Jamie jumps in and brings her to shore.
  • Claire wakes up in a house, and when they ask the owners where they are, they find out they’re in Georgia. They’ve made it to America. And for the first time since Claire came back to him, Jamie is able to openly and honestly introduce himself as Jamie Fraser, and his wife, Claire.

THE END!!

Speculations – What to Expect in Season Three

 

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From the title sequence. I predict we’ll be spending at least 1-3 episodes in the 1960s.

I just spent some time trolling the internet for information from the producers about what  sorts of things we can expect in Season Three. All of this is speculation, because as of the time of the interviews the scripts weren’t finished yet.

Maril Davis said that they will probably keep to the 13 episode-per-season format, so when I post my Season Three speculation page (look for that next weekend), I’ll be breaking Voyager over 13 episodes. If they come back with a different number later, I’ll adjust.

A few points that have been mentioned:

In EOnline, it was stated that we will see what actually happens to Jamie at the Battle of Culloden. That leads me to believe we will actually see Murtagh and BJR’s deaths, and not have to wait three seasons (or so ) to find out what happened to Murtagh. But I am very curious to see what’s going to happen with BJR! Will they take a page from Game of Thrones and go their own way with Diana’s blessing/advice?

Maril also said that they plan to keep Jamie and Claire separated for a while, because they wanted us to really get the sense that 20 years have passed. That leads me to believe the first 2-3 episodes will follow Claire searching for Jamie in the 60s and then the episodes in Jamie’s life that they uncover through their research (The Dunbonnet, Ardsmuir, Helwater). At least, that’s what I would do.

Ron Moore said in an interview that we would not see much of Bree and Roger next season. I think that  “not much” means just those first several episodes – if they follow the book, once Claire goes to the past we don’t get anything else from them (as I recall- it’s been a year since I re-read Voyager and I haven’t even skimmed it yet to do the episode breakdown). But they’ll definitely be back for season four!

Ron also said that the Frank/BJR role was pretty much done after this next season, and I am hoping that the way things stood between Bree and Claire over Frank is what we see, rather than more of Ron’s fanboying. Bree asked Claire if she ever loved Frank, which tells me that their relationship was quite cool indeed. If we get the flashbacks from the books, we’ll see the disastrous dinner party, Claire at medical school, Bree going to the office with Frank, and finally Frank’s death after telling Claire he’s going to take Bree away. They may decide to extrapolate some other things, but I wonder if they’ll go into the infidelity. I believe that they should, but that’s something that Ron may decide to either ignore or treat sympathetically.

In Maril’s Zap2It interview, she said: “There are certain things about Frank in Voyager that come out that he’s not so nice a guy. I don’t know if we’ll play those or not, because I think our Frank is a little different from book Frank.”

So, yeah. Possibly no infidelity. Possibly even no taking Bree away, although they’ll have to write in a different circumstance surrounding his accidental death.

We will definitely get Young Ian! Maril says she’s excited to see him. I am wondering if they will cast someone who is older but who can play younger, so that he can “grow up” over the next few seasons and won’t need to be recast. Although I suppose that his sojourn with the Mohawk is a good time to recast if need be – have the younger actor be there, and then an older actor returns.

So that’s all for now. I’m going to skim Voyager this week and have a speculative episode breakdown ready for next weekend. Then I’m going to try and finish up my attempt to track Jamie and Claire’s relationship throughout the series. That’s going to be much harder to do in Season Two (or much easier), because we simply didn’t see much of them together.

After I finish that, I’m going to post a re-read of Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber, and Voyager. The blogs for the first two books will include my thoughts about why adaptive choices were made for the TV show. The blogs for the third book will include my thoughts about how they might adapt the material for the show. I have no idea how long that will take, but I’m assuming it’s going to go through the fall at least. Then I may or may not continue with the other books in the series, just to have something going up on this site until Droughtlander is over!

NOTE:

Vanity Fair does a good job of summing up the various interviews about Season Three here.

Speculations – Season Two Finale

Murtagh01

Murtagh Fitzgibbons Fraser. Simply the best.

I was going to speculate about the next seasons this week, but I decided to sit down and think about changes that have been made this season and how they might shape the finale.

The truth is, of course, that for everything that was changed, most things were later wrangled back to match the course of the book. But there are still some lingering issues that may cause us to move in a different direction next week.


Rupert is alive.

Rupert survived the church, and I think the chances are that he will survive Culloden. Perhaps he will choose to desert with the Lallybroch men and go to live as Young Jamie’s tacksman during the long awful years that will follow. Depending on how closely they stick to the events of the book, Rupert may witness Jamie kill Dougal. Speculation on various fan pages is that Rupert is still loyal to Dougal and won’t be as easy to intimidate as the random Willie from the book. That may lead to another speculation – that Murtagh will die holding off the vengeful MacKenzies as Claire and Jamie escape to Craig na Dun. But I don’t think that’s going to happen. For one thing, if that were the case, Jamie isn’t going to be able to go back to the battle. It’s a bit of a loose-end in the book that Jamie decides to go back and “get lost” in the confusion and throw himself in front of the British cannon. Of course, it doesn’t matter to him at that point who kills him. But if he goes back to protect the Lallybroch men specifically (as it seems Claire thought he did at the beginning of the season), then there can’t be a big stromash over Dougal’s death.

So I think Rupert has been disillusioned by battle and war and death, and has latched on to Ross, and feels his loyalty split. So he will understand why Jamie and Claire would contemplate a last-ditch effort to thwart certain death.

Lotte Verbeek accidentally revealed that she is in the finale.

I really hope that this news doesn’t mean that we’re doing Gillian Edgars in the finale. At least, not the whole shebang. If anything, it would be useful for Claire to perhaps encounter her by “accident” in Inverness. But if I were the writers, I would save her part of the story for Season Three. Still, the fact that she’s in this episode means we’re either going to deal more directly with her Geillis persona or at least introduce the younger Gillian in 1968. I am quite afraid that we’re going to spend the bulk of our 90-minute finale in the twentieth century. I hope not, but her presence worries me. I certainly don’t think that they will reveal that Geillis did not burn at the stake at all, and is living comfortably in Paris during the events of the Rising.

Murtagh is amazing and everyone loves him.

Not that BookMurtagh isn’t amazing, but he doesn’t quite reach the level of TVMurtagh. One of the reasons (aside from Rupert being the likely choice to see Jamie killing Dougal) that people are speculating that Murtagh will fall defending the Frasers as they retreat to Craig na Dun is because the fandom wants him to have a meaningful death. And while we later find out in the books that Murtagh died protecting Jamie on the field at Culloden (something Jamie did not thank him for at the time), that is not revealed for a LONG TIME. The show will probably try to deal with his death a little more directly and promptly. I’m not convinced that he’ll die fighting off the MacKenzies, but he might be shown dying at Culloden. Or he might come with them to Craig na Dun and fall defeating the redcoat patrol that finds them there.

TV is an immediate, visual medium and it will be difficult to obscure Black Jack Randall’s death (without some level of fandom outrage).

If you aren’t a book reader, you may not realize that we still don’t know exactly how BJR died. Jamie has trauma-induced amnesia about the battle of Culloden, and has only ever remembered snatches of it. All he knows is that he woke up underneath BJR’s dead body, and assumes that BJR may have actually protected him (accidentally or on purpose) from being killed. Jamie does not know whose hand struck the killing blow for BJR, and from things that Jamie has told Brianna, I think he has made peace with that fact. I don’t know that we’ll ever find out exactly how Randall died. Or, if we do, it’s going to be part of the mythical last scenes of the final book, when we’ll find out the truth of Jamie’s ghost in Inverness. I believe Diana has said that that was Jamie during the battle, or perhaps in that moment while he was passed out.

But what I’m really getting to, here, is that I don’t think that level of obscurity will fly on TV. They may try it anyway, to stay consistent with the books, but I’m not sure how well that will work. I mean, I can see how they would do it, but I just don’t know how well they’ll get away with it. Also, BJR is way, way more monstrous in the show. In the book, I hated him, but kinda understood some of what drove him. His love and devotion to his brother made him a complex and much more interesting character. But after last week’s episode, I think we’re fully down the dark path that we started in “The Garrison Commander.” And that Black Jack needs to die horribly, on screen, where everyone can see it, and where there are no questions about how or why.

At least that’s how I feel. I may be wrong. And I’m not even sure I want to be right or wrong. It will be interesting either way.


 

So that’s my speculation for next week. As I’ve stated on my Season Two Speculation page, I think they will open in 1968 and get all the way to St. Kilda before flashing back to 1746. Others have speculated that the two storylines will be intercut, and while that’s possible, I can’t imagine how they’ll manage to build the tension of both stories simultaneously.

Do you have any wild speculations about the season finale? Or have I completely overlooked a change that will have long-term, rippling effects? Leave a comment and let me know!

Speculation – Seasons Three AND Four!!

Happy Outlander Day everyone! We received the news today that Outlander has been renewed for two more seasons!

The only hitch is that the press release mentioned they would be drawing from both Voyager and Drums of Autumn. If you’ve been following my blog, you know that I think Voyager needs to be two seasons. But we don’t know yet how many episodes were ordered (I didn’t see that in the release, anyway – if someone has seen that information, please comment and let me know!), so it is possible that we’re getting longer seasons as well. If we have, say, 16-18 episodes per season, we could get at least partway through Drums by season four.

I can also see them trimming down Claire and Jamie’s separation and focusing more on what happens once Claire returns to the 1700s. I think that it’s important to spend a few episodes apart, but if there’s an episode for The Dun Bonnet, an episode for Ardsmuir, and an episode (or maybe two) for Helwater, that should do it. Then they have the rest of the season to do Edinburgh/smuggling, return to Lallybroch/Laoghaire, the seal’s cove/Young Ian, and finally their departure for the West Indies. If it were me, I would end season three there. But they may go all the way through until we see Geillis again.

Either way, that leaves plenty of room for season four to see them through the early days in North Carolina, meeting with Jocasta, and finally reaching the Ridge. It would be a very nice endpoint to get them there, just in case we don’t get a season five. And they can film two endings – if there’s a renewal, then in the last episode Bree finds the article about the Big House burning and goes back. If not, we wrap things up and she and Roger get to be happy together in the 60s.

I will do a full breakdown of my predictions (episode-by-episode, like I did for season two), during the hiatus, assuming that they make public how many episodes have been ordered.

No matter what, though, I am super excited!!

This concludes your unusual mid-week blog post from Outlander Spoilers!

Speculations – Season Two Episode Breakdown

EDIT: I have cleaned up this post and turned it into a permanent page. Check it out here

It has been a while. I meant to do more posts during the hiatus, but my real life and my own writing have taken precedence. Now there are only seven weeks until the second half of season one starts, so it’s time to get back in the habit of blogging. Between now and then, I’ll do commentary blogs on the teasers, extended scenes, and trailers that have been released as part of droughtlander, and I still want to track the evolution of Jamie and Claire’s relationship over the first eight episodes in a post. I also updated my blog post about the breakdown of the second half of season one. The big change was the addition of the titles that have been released, but I made a few tiny changes to my predictions, too.

But to get things rolling with a new post, I’m going to speculate about season two!

So all we know at this point is that Starz requested 13 episodes for season two. That’s three fewer than this season (although they may ask for more). The question is, how will Ron Moore et al decide to structure their season? From what I can tell from Matt B Robert’s twitter feed, they are already breaking the season and have started writing.

If I were in the writer’s room, I would have two big questions that need to be answered before deciding how to break the season.

EDIT Jan 2016: This question has probably been answered by the fact that they *just* cast Roger and haven’t announced Brianna yet. But they could always be planning to film the 1960s stuff at the end and still put it into the 1st episode. We don’t have an air date yet, so they’ve still got time. 

The first and most important: should the series keep up the 1740s story and run straight through until Culloden, then end the season with a few episodes in 1968? Or is it better to follow the book’s structure of using the 20th century as a framing device?

EDIT: The following question has become moot, since a different actor has been cast for Alex. But he looks similar enough to Tobias to make my breakdown still function. 

The second question: do they actually have Tobias Menzies play Alex Randall? This, I think, is a vitally important question that must be answered before you can start to pull apart the story and restructure it as episodes. Because, if you don’t have him play Alex, things start making less sense. The resemblance between all three men is supposed to be very striking. Alex is possibly the least similar simply because he is younger, but he is, after all, Frank’s true ancestor. So if they don’t cast Tobias, you have to ask if they will follow the books in that respect at all. Do they make BJR Frank’s direct progenitor? How does that change what happens in Paris? Do they cut Alex from the story entirely? If so, what about Mary? What about all of the stuff in Edinburgh?

To make my life easier, I’m going to assume that they will follow the books, both in the bookended story structure and having Tobias play all three Randalls so we can keep Alex’s story intact. Tobias isn’t going to have much, if anything, to do as Frank in this season. Claire has a few memories of what happened when she got back in 1948, but that’s it. They will have to do some tricky camera work to have him interact with himself as Alex and Jack, but that isn’t exactly unprecedented.

So. A 13-episode breakdown of Dragonfly in Amber, following the books pretty closely:

Episode 201 – Through A Looking Glass Darkly

I would condense all of the stuff from part one into this first episode. It’s a nice episode for montage, anyway, with all of the research bits and various travels into the Scottish countryside. It’s hard to decide which parts to keep, but you obviously need to have the first scene, where Claire and Bree visit Roger, and you need to have the scene where he visits Lallybroch. You also need the scene where Bree and Roger go to Culloden, and then the one in the garage since that’s where Roger finds the Reverend’s notebook that gives him the information about Bree’s parentage. Fiona will be there, although perhaps not quite so intrusively as she is in the book, since her flirtation with Roger isn’t really important in terms of the overall story.

Honestly, I think you can cut most of the stuff with Bree and Claire, and the several visits to the manse. Maybe keep the part where Claire wakes up from her erotic dream of Jamie and whispers, “You are so like him” to her sleeping daughter.

I would end the episode at St. Kilda’s, in the graveyard, with Claire collapsing on Jamie’s tombstone.

Episode 202 – The Pretenders

I would start this episode with the briefest of scenes in the manse, with Claire explaining the truth about what happened at the stones. We would open in medias res, so that you don’t bore the viewer with an overview of things they already know from last season. Instead, I’d start with her telling them about the Abbey, and then flash to the 18th century.

There, we’d get Abbott Alexander telling them Charles is in Paris, and then maybe montage some of the journey to Le Havre. There, we’ll get morning sickness and sex, and then break Claire’s perspective and follow Jamie to meet with Jared. Then back to Claire, then to the ship in the harbor. I’m tempted to say that they should pad this episode out with more direct conflict with Le Comte, but it may be enough just to do the plague ship. The episode should definitely end with the plague ship being destroyed.

Episode 203 – Royal Audience

This episode would be all about the Fraser’s introduction to the Court. We’d see a little bit with Jared because they need to introduce Mary’s uncle (and the subsequent conversation Claire and Jamie have about Frank, and Jamie being reassured that BJR is dead), but it would focus on the parties. There would have to be some kind of episode conflict, probably using the Comte since he also appears at society events. But this is where we’d see the King’s levee, Claire puking in the fountain, Raymond’s apothecary shop, Jamie’s story about dueling over Annalise de Merriac, and Alex Randall. I’d move the bit with Alex to the end of the episode, so it leaves the audience assuming it’s BJR. Of course, that only works if, as I said, they cast Tobias as Alex. (Edit: or maybe have them do a hazy dream-effect, and then at the beginning of the next episode, it clears to reveal the new actor.)

Episode 204 – L’Hopital des Anges

We open on Alex, and the realization that he is not BJR. Then I would have the scene where Claire dreams of Frank, and have her and Jamie’s talk afterward. Then we’d have the party where she meets Herr Gerstmann and he suggests she go to L’Hopital des Anges. The conflict in the episode will start with Jamie forbidding her to go, and then we’ll get the encounter with Charles and the monkey, and Claire waxing with Louise de la Tour. I would move Jamie’s meeting with Fergus up a little bit, and have her tell him, if he’s going to be getting into so much trouble and allowing Fergus to put himself in danger, then he shouldn’t mind if she does what she is meant to do. He will acquiesce, and we’ll get the introduction of Mother Hildegarde and Bouton. This may also be a good place to put Jamie having to discipline Fergus – maybe on Claire’s first-ever trip to L’Hopital she refuses to leave and gets home late, and Fergus demands that Jamie punish him.

Episode 205 – Deceptions (NOTE – this is the episode that can be trimmed in order to expand the episodes focused on the Rising – the only really important bits are what they learn from the cipher and Claire’s poisoning)***

I would open this episode with a montage of Claire at L’Hopital des Anges, possibly with some intercutting to Raymond. Then have the scene with Louise’s illegitimate pregnancy, some action shots of Fergus stealing and returning letters (nice bits of tension- will he be caught?), Jamie bringing the cipher to Mother Hildegarde, Claire’s poisoning, and the implications that St. Germain is still out to get Claire. I would probably excise the bits with Mssr. Forez. He’s interesting, historically, but doesn’t do much for the plot. I’d probably get rid of the bit with Jamie and the whores, too. Not plot-relevant, and we don’t need the Claire/Jamie conflict. The end of Part Two in the book makes a great end to the episode- Claire feeling Faith for the first time.

Episode 206 – Malchance

This is just about the half-way point, and the whole of Part Three in the book makes a nice episode. It starts with Claire and Mary Hawkins being attacked, and ends with Jamie agreeing not to kill BJR until after he’s fathered the child that will one day be Frank’s ancestor. In the middle, we have the revelation that Claire is Le Dame Blanche, the disastrous dinner party, Raymond acknowledging Claire’s skill as a healer (help to heal) and trading information for the true story of the party, Jamie and Claire encountering BJR at Sandringham’s, Dougal in Paris, Claire getting BJR arrested, and then the awful scene between Claire and Jamie when she begs him not to kill BJR for Frank’s sake.

Episode 207 – The Best Laid Plans of Mice and Men

I can’t decide if this episode should bother including the bit at the stud farm. It would be hilarious to watch Fergus with the stable boys and the horse, but they don’t get that much info there. So it might be better to go straight into planning to hijack the wine ship with the fake smallpox outbreak. There would have to be a little bit in here about how they know about the wine venture, but that’s easily explained by Fergus’s letter thefts. ((Assuming the previous episode was trimmed, there also needs to be at least some hint about the cipher promising money for landing on English soil – that becomes relevant at the end of the book, and very relevant in Voyager)). Something less random would have to draw Jamie to the whorehouse where he sees BJR raping Fergus. It needs to be something associated with their plot against Charles, something that will really make Jamie think that what’s happening is his fault. Then the episode ends with him and BJR dueling, and Claire collapsing in a pool of blood as she miscarries.

Episode 208 – The Coming of the Light

This episode has a lot of ground to cover. We have to get from Raymond healing Claire, to Fontainebleau, to Claire’s deal with Louis to get Jamie out of the Bastille, to the wizard’s duel and the supposed death of Saint Germain, to Jamie and Murtagh’s successful sea venture, to Jamie’s return to Claire. I would end it with her lie – that she didn’t have sex with Louis – but I would make sure that the audience already knows that it is a lie. It isn’t playing fair with the reader in the book when Claire lies to us, too.

Episode 209 – “I Am Come Home”

Start with Jamie and Claire reconciling in France (from part four), but probably skip the cave. It’s interesting and beautiful, but not plot-relevant. Montage to Scotland, and then the little bits of daily life at Lallybroch. Rabbie’s seizures, Ian and Jamie’s difficulty after Jamie tells Ian about BJR, and end with the letter from Charles and the Bill of Association, and Jenny telling Jamie to ask Ian to come. The Ian/Jamie conflict would be the driving force of the episode. ((NOTE – this is also a place where trimming could happen. If so, the battle of Prestonpans would end the episode.))

Episode 210 – The Flames of Rebellion

This episode would definitely have the infamous encounter between Jamie and young Lord John, and I think it would be best to go through the battle of Prestonpans, intercut from Jamie’s PoV and Claire’s. Then, it would have to segue to Edinburgh, and Colum and Dougal’s arrival. Colum dies, and Claire makes her deal with BJR for information. The episode ends with Charles sending Jamie to Beuly. ((If the earlier episode is trimmed, there is more time to expand on BJR and the MacKenzies.))

Episode 211 – The Stuart Witch

Again, lots of ground to cover. Highlights: Jamie eventually gets his Fraser family’s support, but is incensed when the Old Fox wants to take credit for the Lallybroch men. I would probably skip the part where they go back to Lallybroch, and just have them go back to Edinburgh and find the men in the Tollgate. I’d cut the bit where Jamie and Simon go to talk to Charles, maybe the whole bit where the men are imprisoned. Honestly, I would cut the whole section with Lovat, if not for that important line – “One Fraser from the Master of Lovat’s regiment…”) Claire encounters Mary, and Jamie and BJR become unwilling allies over Alex and Mary’s unborn child (Damn all Randalls!). I am fairly certain that the night of Alex’s death is also the night Claire got pregnant with Brianna, so there will probably be sex. Then the episode has to end with the battle of Falkirk, Rupert’s death, and Claire in the hands of the English.

Episode 212 – “Sing Me a Song of a Lass That Is Gone”

It’s too complicated to get Claire all the way to Sandringham’s estate, so I would just say that he’s taken over a local Scottish estate and Claire is brought directly there, along with Mary (who BJR has sent back to her family, although she is now protected by his name). Then the events cascade, leading to Hugh Munro’s death, Murtagh killing Sandringham for what happened in Paris, Jamie killing Dougal over Claire, signing the Deed of Sasine and sending it to Lallybroch with Fergus, then Jamie and Claire marking each other in the croft and Claire’s flight through the stones. ((see note below for how trimming would affect this episode))

Episode 213 – Hindsight

Brianna refuses to believe, but Roger is convinced. The changed wedding ring will come into play here, because it isn’t going to be engraved, and it won’t allow for that moment of absolute sorrow from Claire. Of course, it’s rather unlikely that a surgeon would never have removed her rings in twenty years, but I whistle past that when I read the books. In any case, Claire will present Roger with the choice to try and save Gillian Edgars. Of course he tries (and they fail), but in the process, Claire proves irrevocably to Roger and Bree that time travel is possible. The season ends with Roger quoting the line about the “officer from the Master of Lovat’s regiment” who survived. “He meant to die on Culloden Field,” Roger whispered. “But he didn’t.”

———-

If the decision is not to use the framing device, then all of the episodes get shifted. What I listed as 201 would become 212, and 202 would become 201. If the decision is not to use Tobias as Alex, that would cause subtle shifts in the way things are shot and written, and how much you can get away with in regard to the physical similarities. Does Tobias have a brother that acts? Or a very similar-looking cousin?

***Another thing I noticed while breaking out the episodes is that, like Diana, I spent a lot more time with episodes in France than I did with the actual Rising. It may be better for the show to shift things a little more and devote another episode to the ’45. Some of the court intrigue and plotting can go, and I marked the episode where pretty much everything can be cut or at least slipped into another episode (For example: is it really important that Mother Hildegarde solves the Goldberg Variation cipher? They could just get that info from a stolen letter). Also, although I love the quieter moments and character development at Lallybroch, that can be trimmed, too. Those cuts would allow for more time with the MacKenzie brothers and BJR’s deal with Claire, as well as providing a whole extra episode to split between dealing with the Frasers at Beuly and BJR marrying Mary Hawkins. I would call that episode “Damn All Randalls.” The existing episode 211 would then start at Falkirk. Everyone loves Rupert, and we need to have some time to grieve his death in the church. But then I stand by Claire’s capture and transport to Sandringham needing to happen much more quickly than in the book, and I would end the episode with Sandringham’s death. Then the final episode of the 1740s section would start with the party’s arrival at Culloden House, and end with Claire going back to Craigh na Dun.

I’m actually way happier with that breakdown, but I’ll leave my initial thoughts up since they follow the book a little more closely.

Whenever we get an episode order for Voyager, I’ll break that down, too. Although I would actually like to see Voyager as two seasons of twelve episodes. One season for before C & J are reunited, and one for after.

What do you think of my episode breakdown? What would you do differently? There are all kinds of things that could probably be cut, and characters that can be conflated. Leave a comment with your ideas.

Speculations – Time Travel

This is going to be a bit of a ramble and a wander through my ideas. I may go back and edit/revise my blogs at some point, as I tend to post them immediately with only cursory (spelling) revision. They could all stand to have some cutting and tightening.

Anyway.

Idea One: Time flows concurrently, no matter when you are. In (I think) episode two, my husband, who has not read the books, asked why Claire is in such a hurry to leave. “Can’t she just go back to the moment that she left?” He’s coming at this from a Back to the Future time travel perspective, where you program a date and time into the DeLorean’s dash, floor the gas pedal to 88, and bang: the flux capacitor delivers you to your time period destination. But that isn’t how things work in Outlander.

(EDIT- in a recent (April 2016) episode of The Scot and the Sassenach, Alastair referred to concurrent timelines as “San Dimas Time.” In the movie Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure (which is getting another sequel!!), for every hour that they spend moving in time, an equal hour passes in San Dimas.)

We don’t truly understand Outlanderverse time travel yet, even in the books. All of the characters that can do it have theories about how it works, but we have few definitive answers. The “default” seems to be that you always go 202 years from the point when you left. That suggests that time continues to run concurrently, no matter when you are.

Even though they’ve figured out quite a bit about time travel by book eight, Claire knows nothing when she first touches the stones, not even that she could possibly steer with a gemstone. So no, Steve (that’s my husband), she can’t just go back to the moment she left. That’s proven by seeing Frank dealing with the loss of Claire in episode 108 (EDIT: And again in episode 201, when she comes back in 1948). The same amount of time has passed for both of them, and he’s spiraling into despair and desperation.

In the book, Father Anselm says something similar. It has been nearly a year since Beltane by the time Claire and Jamie are at the Abbey, and he says, “won’t your husband have moved on by now, tried to put his life back together, perhaps even found someone else?” So it is a generally understood time travel principle in the Outlanderverse that time runs concurrently.

Idea Two: Outlander is a stable time loop. One of the fun things about time travel stories is figuring out how the author makes it work. Now, I don’t mean the physics involved (although both the show and, in the books, Brianna, try to explain it in terms of places of pooled energy), but rather how time travel affects the world.

A couple of time travel tropes:

  • The stable time loop. This is where everything always happened the way it happens. The Pern books are an example of a stable time loop. Lessa makes the enormous jump back in time to bring the Weyrs forward because she knows the Weyrs have been deserted for years and, therefore, she must have always done it. For the most part, the Outlanderverse is a stable time loop. It is hinted at that, if Claire and Jamie hadn’t managed to undermine Charles’ attempts to raise funds, that he might have been successful during the Rising. So not only did they not stop it, but they may have contributed to its failure. Since the Rising has already happened for Claire, it can be said that she was meant to go back in time and take part in those events.
  • The multiverse. This is time travel where things can be changed. But, in order to avoid paradoxes, each time something is changed, a parallel universe is formed. Back to the Future is a multiverse. Changes to past and future cause a new timeline to be spawned (as explained in the second film). Sometimes that’s a good thing (Marty’s much more successful family) and sometimes it’s bad (Biff’s gambling-land).
  • The paradox. HG Wells’ The Time Machine deals with paradox. It isn’t a stable time loop because things can be superficially changed. The protagonist tries to change the past, but both can and can’t at the same time. If his wife lives, what was his reason for building the time machine in the first place? So every time he “saves” her, time “fixes” itself by making her die again.
  • The everything. Doctor Who is an “everything” time travel show, depending on what the writers need that week. We’ve had paradox episodes (the one where Rose saves her father’s life) and the show has famous “fixed points” in time that not even the Doctor can change. Sometimes these turn out to be stable time loops – like with the 10th Doctor in Pompeii. But there are also indications of a multiverse. For example: why don’t people remember, in the 11th’s time, all of the things that happened with 10? That has yet to be answered satisfactorily.

There are other time travel paradigms, but those are some of the main ones.

The only clue we have that time travel might not be a completely stable loop is the reference that Roger makes, in An Echo in the Bone (pg 225 in the hardcover edition), to the newspaper notice having changed. But that’s ret-conning, because in the end of A Breath of Snow and Ashes, we’re given the scene where the printer uses the wrong month because the slug for the correct month has gone missing.

Diana has ret-conned before. Originally the Montauk Five disappeared in New England; Bree remembers that a body was found in the mountains somewhere there. But when we meet Donner, he says they used the stones on Ocracoke. And, to muddy the waters even more, Robert Springer/Otter Tooth’s journal indicates that he came through at the circle near the rhododendron hell that Roger found. Some people point to this as evidence that travel between stones as well as between times is possible, but I don’t know about that.

In any case, I’m not sure what to make of the different death notice. But every other “can we change the past” question has been answered in the negative (or, if you accept that they are “changing” things just by being there, that those changes were always meant to have happened), so I’m still sticking with the stable time loop.

I think one of the reasons for the ret-conning is because at first, Diana didn’t dig into the whys and wherefores of time travel. It was just a mechanism that got her outspoken 20th-century heroine into her 18th-century Scottish story. But as the series has progressed, the story has required some changes to her original ideas, and some of the ideas have been clarified and codified. There’s a whole bit when Roger and Bree are back in 1980 where they write out a “Time Travelers Guide” a la Douglas Adams.

Idea Three: How Time Travel works, as of MOBY:

  • Using gemstones (possibly also blood and fire) helps you steer beyond the standard 202 years. This doesn’t quite negate San Dimas time, because it seems like it would be quite difficult to come back moments after you left.
  • Precious metals provide some protection (speculation that Claire’s gold wedding ring protected her on her first trip, and the gold and silver together on subsequent trips).
  • It’s easier to travel at the equinoxes and solstices, although possible (not recommended!) at other times.
  • There are some metaphysical speculations that connection to a particular person makes travel “easier.” When Jamie takes Claire to the stones the first time in Outlander, and she starts to enter the time passage, she can feel both him and Frank. Later in the books, although it isn’t “fun” for them, Jem and Mandy travel VERY easily because they have a deep psychic connection to each other and their family members. (More speculation about the nature of travelers below.)
  • You cannot travel to a point at which you already exist. Roger tried and almost died.
  • It is not advisable to travel forward, although we don’t know why. In “The Space Between,” Saint Germain wants desperately to do it because he is trying to extend his life. Raymond tells him it is a bad idea, and Joan’s voices tell her to tell him “don’t do it.” I was so mad at the end of the story that we switched back to Michael and Joan’s PoVs and didn’t find out what happened!! Diana, I am totally OK with waiting longer for a main series book if you will put out a “what happened next” story.
    • PS – Raymond has almost certainly traveled forward, given that he was originally from the prehistoric Orkney Islands. I think he’s come unstuck in time, and that’s why he tells Saint Germain not to try to go forward.

Side rant: some people have said that they couldn’t stick with the book series after Dragonfly because it started getting “too weird” or “too sci-fi” for them. I don’t think it is sci-fi enough. I love reading about the mechanics of time travel, and I am DYING to read the Raymond story that Diana mentioned (in the National Geographic article about the Orkneys) that she’s planning. But I’m a fantasy writer, and worldbuilding fascinates me. YMMV.

Idea Four: Wild Speculations.

  • The blue aura of Raymond’s family is a sort of “extra energy” that travelers have. It allows them to enter the passage, and depending on how strong it is, protects them in the space between time. This is why some people still die in there. The aura allows them to do what we might consider “magic.” Raymond tells Claire she has a blue aura in Dragonfly in Amber (it’s why he calls her Madonna), and she sees him through a haze of blue light when he heals her after her miscarriage. The blue light healing/connection is seen again with Dr. McEwan in MOBY and with Saint Germain in “The Space Between.” There is some indication that this aura is connected to an ability to manipulate physical reality. Claire is an excellent diagnostician because she can use that sixth sense to figure out what is wrong (physically and emotionally) with a patient. We know that it’s more than just reading people’s body language cues and palpating their abdomens because she does it to a skeleton (that turns out to be Geillis Duncan, who, by the by, is someone Claire has already/not yet killed with her own hand – talk about freaky time travel dynamics). Dr. McEwan has taken it a step farther- he can, in a limited way, manipulate people’s actual flesh (he says he knows what the body should feel like, and he attempts to make it more like how he knows it should be). He uses this to heal people, notably Buck and Roger.
    • From the Daily Lines snippets that Diana posts, Claire will be experimenting with using Dr. McEwan’s healing methods on Roger in Book Nine. I almost called it “Blue Magic,” but in the Final Fantasy game series, blue magic is when you can copy other creature’s attacks and skills. Not the same thing!
  • Mandy and Jem are very strong travelers, probably because both of their parents can do it. Even though Jem is haunted by his experience at the stones on Ocracoke, he has no problem going after Mandy when she dashes through at Craigh na Dun. And the two kids have a very strong psychic link with each other and their parents (and, to a lesser extent, other people). I think their auras are much larger than normal as a consequence of having two time-traveling parents.
  • At least one of Claire’s parents was a traveler. We’ve gotten stories about Roger’s family as travelers (from Gillian herself, to Buck, to Jerry MacKenzie), but nothing about Claire’s family. There are hints in the last couple of books that she may be related to the Beauchamp family that Percy Wainwright has married into. And it is not unreasonable to speculate that the child Percy seeks (who may or may not actually be Fergus) is the progenitor of Claire’s family line. I don’t think it’s Fergus, to be honest. But if there is such a child, and if said child reappeared and took up the family name, then escaped during the Terror to England and started using the English pronunciation of the name…it makes sense. Also, when Lord John goes to visit the Beauchamps, he notes that the brother is a terrible card player. Hello glass face? The corollary to this supposition is, if Saint Germain really did have a child with the lost sister, and that child is Claire’s great-great-whatever…Saint Germain might actually be her many times great-grandfather. MIND BLOWN.

I could ramble on about this forever, but I need to go and do my actual job that makes me actual money. Anyone else have some speculations about time travel in the Outlanderverse? What’s your favorite time travel story, other than Outlander? Do you love or hate a particular time travel paradigm? Leave me a comment and let me know!