Episode 110 – By the Pricking of My Thumbs

My overall reaction to this episode was “well…huh.”

Firstly, I was quite certain that Ron Moore said in an interview at some point that they weren’t going to do the changeling. Perhaps I misheard? I can’t find it now, anyway, so who knows what he actually said. Maybe I conflated the changeling and the water horse. So I wasn’t expecting to see that.

Secondly, the whole fandom had pretty much decided that Dougal wasn’t married in the show, since his wife had never come up after nine episodes. It was weird to have it only come up here, and then to have Dougal’s extremely melodramatic reaction was out of character and just awkward.

There are times when sticking to the books makes the show have to turn itself in knots, and this episode is one of them. They needed to get to the plot points of Geillie and Dougal’s affair, and it’s more dramatic if they’re both married and both spouses die. It’s also a better explanation for why Colum exiles Dougal, but I’d have believed the exile even if the only reason Colum wanted him away was to keep them from eloping/take care of Geillis. Which is what happens in the book, anyway. So they kept things in that they didn’t need to keep and elaborated on things that didn’t need elaboration.

There are a couple of elaborations that I love. The Duke of Sandringham is one. I am fond of this new, “I don’t like work” version of the duke. The sportsman with the high-pitched voice from the book is funny, but this one feels like he’s part of a high-stakes political game, and that he would fit in perfectly at court.

I’m also a fan of Claire confronting him directly, and actually telling Jamie about the connection to Randall. It’s hard to understand why she doesn’t in the book.

The duel is a fun little moment, and I’m neither for nor against the addition. I don’t feel that it really adds anything to the story, but it doesn’t make anything worse and it gives us a little more time with Jamie, so I’m fine with it.

The summoning in the woods is gorgeous, but it makes me wonder what they’re going to do in the abbey. Claire learned the opium/hypnosis trick that she uses to save Jamie from Geillis in the book. Maybe she’ll have some kind of flashback to a soldier under opium in the war.

Speaking of flashbacks, OMG how many times are we going to have to see Reverend Wakefield and Frank opining about the Duke of Sandringham? Do they really think we’ve forgotten? Or that there are tons of people who haven’t watched the first nine episodes just now jumping in on episode ten?

Anyway, I adore Colum in the scene where he banishes Dougal and Jamie. We feel his power as Laird, not with physical menace the way that Dougal does things, or with wit and humor the way Jamie does it (although he can and will show physical menace, too), but by a kind of magnetism and strength that is inside of him. Jamie’s reluctant obedience is fantastic.

Dougal’s claim to love Geillis rings a little false until he mentions the child. We haven’t heard about his daughters in the show, and now that we’ve heard about Maura I would think they would have mentioned the girls. So I’m guessing that he is hoping to marry Geillis and finally have a legitimate child of his own. That need gives him vulnerability.

Mrs. Fitz is so sweet with Claire, but I wonder how much she guesses of her granddaughter’s affections and intentions. It’s Tammas who delivers the note – Laoghaire’s cousin – and I’m betting she asked him to do it. He probably just thought it was a prank. After all, Claire saved his life.

I like that Geillis is proud and self-assured when Claire comes to her, rather than drunk and dissolute like she is in the books. Although why Claire doesn’t say “Dougal is gone” when Geillis says he’ll protect her, I have no idea. It may be a function of the way they edited the scene, but it feels like Claire had plenty of time before Jeanie opened the door to say “Christ, Geillis, Dougal is miles away, with Jamie, and Colum is out to get you.” Then they could have both gone out the back.

Meh.

I haven’t mentioned the opening scene, although it was lovely and captured well the description from the book of butterfly wings. It felt very soft and loving and showed us exactly where Claire and Jamie are now. So did the scene with the changeling. Jamie says almost the exact same line he said in the Black Kirk (about the people not knowing much more than what Father Bain tells them), but this time with gentle affection. I still need to finish my blog post tracking the Claire/Jamie relationship arc over the season, but maybe I will wait until the whole season is done, and then I’ll have all sixteen episodes to work with.

In general, this was not my favorite episode. It did have a couple of very nice scenes, and I enjoyed it more than I did 109, but 109 tried something daring and failed (in my opinion). This one didn’t do much that was daring, and sometimes it’s better to fail spectacularly than to succeed mediocre-ly. *not a word*

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